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My assigment is to create my own linked list class (I can't use Java's LinkedList class) and implement a selection sort on it by swapping pointers rather than data.

I've created a double-linked MyLinkedList class, but I'm having trouble with the sort method. I've tried a number of things but nothing has worked - not even anything that would make sense to post here for correction. (I do know that I need to use at least one temp Node.) It has to be a selection sort.

I'm not looking for someone to code it for me, necessarily; I'm hoping someone can help me with an algorithm that I can then turn into code myself. Any help is appreciated greatly.

Here's how I've implemented the MyLinkedList class and the associated Node class:

public class MyLinkedList
{
    private Node head;
    private int count;

    public MyLinkedList()
    {
        head = new Node(null);
        count = 0;
    }

    public void add(String line)
    {
        Node temp = new Node(line);
        Node current = head;

        while (current.getNext() != null)
        {
            current = current.getNext();
        }

        temp.setLine (line);  // not sure this is how to do it
        current.setNext(temp);
        temp.setPrev(current);
        count++;
    }

    public void displayList()
    {
        Node current = head;

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            current = current.getNext();
            System.out.println(current.getLine());
        }
    }

    public void sortList()
    {       
        Node start = head;
        Node index = start;
        Node min = start;

        Node temp1, temp2;

        while (start.getNext() != null)
        {
            index = index.getNext();

            if (index.getLine().compareTo(min.getLine()) < 0)
            {
                min = index;
            }

            //swap - HELP, PLEASE :-)
            {
                // Algorithm???
            }
        }
    }

    public int size()
    {
        return count;
    }


    private class Node
    {
        String textLine;
        Node next;
        Node prev;

        public Node()
        {
            textLine = null;
            next = null;
            prev = null;
        }

        public Node (String line)
        {
            textLine = (line);
            next = null;
            prev = null;
        }

        public Node (String line, Node node1, Node node2)
        {
            textLine = line;
            prev = node1;
            next = node2;
        }

        public String getLine()
        {
            return textLine;
        }

        public Node getNext()
        {
            return next;
        }

        public Node getPrev()
        {
            return prev;
        }

        public void setLine(String line)
        {
            textLine = line;
        }

        public void setNext(Node nextNode)
        {
            next = nextNode;
        }

        public void setPrev(Node prevNode)
        {
            prev = prevNode;
        }
    }
}
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Do your add and remove methods work properly on the list? Have you tried just doing a stupid sort method first and working from there? Something like making a new list, and then just get the smallest entry each time? –  dann.dev Mar 7 '12 at 4:12
    
Also try and make methods that do everything you need for selection sort, break it into smaller problems basically. Make a method that swaps 2 nodes first, then make a method that finds a certain node, then make a method to find the smallest node, then make a method to find the smallest node after a given node. –  dann.dev Mar 7 '12 at 4:17
    
First things first, does your code build the list properly? I mean have you tried displaying the list after adding some temp values? –  noMAD Mar 7 '12 at 4:17
    
Yes, my code builds and displays the list properly. The main method asks the user for a file name, then reads the file and calls the add method to store each line in its own separate node. The displayList function outputs each node, in turn, to the screen. –  Erica Mar 7 '12 at 4:58
    
I suggest you to keep a reference to the the tail (last node) too, it will optimize your add method –  Amir Pashazadeh Mar 7 '12 at 5:41
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2 Answers

It may get confusing if an empty MyLinked List has a node in it even if it's just one with null prev, next and data, so you need to be careful of that MyLinkedList constructor - it would probably be much easier if it read simply head = null;.

Also it would be useful if a MyLinked List had a tail node as well to save you following the chain to the end to find where add should put a new Node.

After that, I think the problem is that you haven't noticed you need two loops: one to work your way through the list to keep track of where the unsorted nodes start, and one to find the smallest node from thereon. You also need to write a swap method for Node so that you can write something like this untested pseudocode that just happens to look a lot like Java

for (index = head; index != null; index = index.getNext()) {
  min = index;
  for (test = min.getNext(); test != null; test = test.getNext) {
    if (test.getLine().compareTo(min.getLine()) < 0)
        min = test;
  }
  if (min != index) {
    swap(index, min);
    index = min;
  }
}

and swap would look roughly like

public void swap(Node other)
{
  Node temp;

  temp = next;
  next = other.getNext();
  other.setNext(temp);

  temp = prev;
  prev = other.getPrev();
  other.setPrev(temp);

  other.getNext().setPrev(this);
  other.getPrev().setNext(this);

  this.getNext().setPrev(other);
  this.getPrev().setNext(other);
}

Note again this is completely untested and hasn't even seen a compiler.

Make sure to think about special cases like when the list is empty or has only one element in it, and when there is only one node left unsorted in the list.


I couldn't leave this without pointing out that swap is actually a lot more complex than that. I've added a few lines to correct the pointers in the nodes before and after the nodes to be swapped. You also need to consider:

  • Whether either of the nodes that are swapped are at the end of the list, in which case the head (and tail if you have one) of the list will need to be updated instead of the pointers in the adjacent nodes. That's fairly obvious.

  • Whether the nodes to be swapped are next to each other in the list, when if you apply the normal algorithm you get nodes pointing to themselves. That's less obvious.

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Thanks very much for the help! –  Erica Mar 9 '12 at 3:01
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This wikipedia article has the pseudocode for the selection sort. Hopefully, that should push you in the right direction...if not pretty much already there.

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