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I want to list all directories using a shell script. I am using the following code:

DIR="$1"

if [ $# -ne 1 ]
then
    echo "Usage: $0 {dir-name}"
exit 1
fi

cd "$DIR"
SAVEIFS=$IFS
IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b")
for user in $( ls -d */)
do
  for dirs in $( ls -d $PWD/$user*)
  do
    echo $PWD/$user/$dirs;
  done
done
IFS=$SAVEIFS

It is working for me if that directory don't have any spaces on it, else it split the output for every spaces on it. I got the following output:

abhinaba@abhinaba-desktop:~/software$ sh test.sh /media/2C44138344134F48/RB1
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/VB*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/DLI*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/3001/*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/VB*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/DLI*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/3002/*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/VB*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/DLI*: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access /m: No such file or directory
ls: cannot access dia/2C44138344134F48/RB1/3003/*: No such file or directory
share|improve this question
    
Can you be more precise on the question: do you need only the directories with space on it? Or do you need to "do your stuff" on all directories, including the ones with space in their name? –  JScoobyCed Mar 7 '12 at 6:26
    
You need to run the script with BASH "bash test.sh /media/2C44138344134F48/RB1" –  JScoobyCed Mar 7 '12 at 6:40
    
I need to list all directories, with or without spaces on it. –  biztiger Mar 7 '12 at 6:42
    
I understood that but the question in the title is not clear. I have updated my answer. I had the same error by running through "sh test.sh ..." –  JScoobyCed Mar 7 '12 at 6:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDITED: removed ls to optimize the script (from tripleee)

If you use BASH shell:

#!/bin/bash

SAVEIFS=$IFS
IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b")
DIR="$1"

if [ $# -ne 1 ]
 then
 echo "Usage: $0 {dir-name}"
 exit 1
fi

cd "$DIR"

for user in $(ls -d */)
 do
 for dirs in $(ls -d $user*)
  do
  echo $dirs
 done
done

IFS=$SAVEIFS

Run the above "test.sh" script like this:

bash test.sh /media/2C44138344134F48/RB1

or simply (if you are already in BASH and you have set the eXecutable flag)

./test.sh /media/2C44138344134F48/RB1

Reference

share|improve this answer
    
Now it can't list any directory. I am attaching the output on my original post.. –  biztiger Mar 7 '12 at 6:25
    
Strange. It works on my Ubuntu, using BASH shell. I missed the last line of the script a few minutes ago (the line that sets back the original IFS. Maybe you need to try in a new shell (just type 'bash') –  JScoobyCed Mar 7 '12 at 6:31
    
I am also using ubuntu 11.10 and working on bash shell but I am still getting the error. –  biztiger Mar 7 '12 at 6:40
2  
ls in backticks to drive a for loop is basically always wrong. partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html#ls –  tripleee Mar 7 '12 at 7:00
    
With the wildcards fixed, I don't think you need to mess with IFS any longer. –  tripleee Mar 7 '12 at 10:29

The simple script below will do what you need.

#!/bin/bash

function usage() {
        echo "Usage: `basename $0` <dir-name>"
}


if [ "x$1" = "x" ]
then
        usage
        exit 0
fi

find "$1" -type 'd'
share|improve this answer

It would actually be easiest to use find:

find PATH -type d -name '* *'

Or if you need to do something with each result, consider piping it to xargs

find PATH -type d -name '* *' -print0 | xargs -0 run-some-command

Or if you just want all the directories safely escaped into arguments then:

find PATH -type d -print0 | xargs -0 run-some-command

Inside run-some-command, each argument to the script will be properly set to each directory name regardless of what characters it contains.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, maybe OP question is not in line with the post content. I think he wants to process all directories in a directory but his script fails because of the ones with space in the name. –  JScoobyCed Mar 7 '12 at 6:25
    
Yes, I need to process al directories within it. –  biztiger Mar 7 '12 at 6:44

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