Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to know if it is possible to do the following:

        using (MyClass o = new MyClass())
        {
            TheClassIWantMyClassToSee x = new TheClassIWantMyClassToSee();
            x.DoStuff();
        }

I'd like to create a class (MyClass) and use it in a using block. Inside this block, I want to work with objects of a certain type (TheClassIWantMyClassToSee). When using block falls out of scope, I want to perform certain actions on these (TheClassIWantMyClassToSee) objects.

Is it possible to make a class aware of other objects declared in its scope transparently?

I realise that I could add object instances to the MyClass object, but I'd like to make it easier for developers working with the API I'm building.

Any ideas are welcome.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I think you are going to have to provide some more context, your question as it stands makes little sense. Can you tell us a little about the API you are building? –  ColinE Mar 7 '12 at 6:28
    
You were quite clear, but you are asking something quite peculiar. It would help to know why you are asking. –  ColinE Mar 7 '12 at 6:33
    
:) I realise that it is quite an odd question. I was mostly just checking to see if something like this was possible. I'm building a custom "data context" object which persists data to a back-end; so I just wanted to see if it would be possible to have a way where I don't need to explicitly add objects to the context, but merely use them in a using block and the scope picks up that objects were created and changed. –  Johann de Swardt Mar 7 '12 at 6:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only way to make MyClass aware of TheClassIWantMyClassToSee is by creating a reference from one to the other. There is no way to navigate and explore the classes that are in scope. This statement is true regardless of whether the scope relates to a using block, method block, foreach loop or other.

Why not have a simple MyClass.AddRelationship(TheClassIWantMyClassToSee child) method that makes this class aware of the other?

share|improve this answer

What are these "certain actions"? If they're resource cleanup, then TheClassIWantMyClassToSee should implement IDisposable too, and you can use another using statement. Otherwise, you could just use a try/finally block:

using (MyClass o = new MyClass())
{
    TheClassIWantMyClassToSee x = new TheClassIWantMyClassToSee();
    try
    {
        x.DoStuff();
    }
    finally
    {
        // Do stuff here
    }
}

There's no way of adding code to the finally block which is implicitly at the end of the using statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clearing that up, also didn't think it was possible. The "certain actions" would be saving data to a data store. I thought of using the IDisposable interface for this, but it doesn't solve the problem of implicitly having access to the variables declared within the scope. It would be a nice language feature to allow code to access the scope it is being called from in a using block. Albeit a little odd. –  Johann de Swardt Mar 7 '12 at 6:35
    
If you look at similar APIs such as nHibernate where a model object is stored to a database, they all require that you manually associate the model object with a session, as per my answer. It would be a nice feature, but a bit confusing! –  ColinE Mar 7 '12 at 6:38
    
Yup. I can see people doing horrible things with a language feature like that :) Would be very nice if Microsoft provided an interface similar to IDisposable which the using statement could pick up on and fire events when objects are created or changed. An IScopeInterrogator or something. –  Johann de Swardt Mar 7 '12 at 6:42
1  
@JohanndeSwardt: I don't think it would pass the cost/benefit test, to be honest. After all, we've already got try/finally. If the actions on your "nested" objects is really linked to the lifetime (pre-disposal) of your "top-level" object then it sounds like it does make sense for the one to know about the others... –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '12 at 7:01
    
I agree with the cost/benefit thing. The only really good application I can see for this is transparent logging, but there are other frameworks available that do this already. –  Johann de Swardt Mar 7 '12 at 7:10

The more strongly typed your design, the easier it will be for others to use your API. (intellisense) You should add it to other object, most likely.

share|improve this answer

You can try to use MyClass as a factory for all the "insider" classes, so You always get a chance to associate the new instances with the MyClass instance.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.