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My MySQL table country_phone_codes looks something like this

id     country_code     area_code     name
------------------------------------------------------------
1   |   93           |  93         |  AFGHANISTAN
2   |   93           |  9370       |  AFGHANISTAN - MOBILE
3   |   93           |  9375       |  AFGHANISTAN - MOBILE
4   |   355          |  355        |  ALBANIA
5   |   355          |  35568      |  ALBANIA - MOBILE - AMC
6   |   213          |  213        |  ALGERIA
7   |   213          |  2131       |  ALGERIA - CAT
------------------------------------------------------------

These are just few records of more than 28000 records. I am trying to formulate a query that will provide me with the result like this-

country_code    name
-----------------------------
93            |  AFGHANISTAN
355           |  ALBANIA
213           |  ALGERIA
-----------------------------

By using SELECT DISTINCT(country_code) FROM country_phone_codes ORDER BY country_code LIMIT 0,260, I am able to get distinct country codes. But how do I get corresponding country name?

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If you use the query mentioned in first few answers you'll randomly get e.g. AFGHANISTAN or AFGHANISTAN - MOBILE for code #93. –  Salman A Mar 7 '12 at 6:39
    
@SalmanA, perhaps true for SQL, but not for MySQL, which this question pertains to. –  danorton Mar 7 '12 at 6:49
1  
@danorton: true for MySQL, not applicable on other database that require full group by. When a column is specified in select list that is not present in GROUP BY, MySQL will happily return any value it finds in the grouped rows. It could return AFGHANISTAN - MOBILE when you were expecting AFGHANISTAN. Reference‌​. –  Salman A Mar 7 '12 at 6:57
    
I stand corrected and have added the MIN() function to the name column selection in my answer. –  danorton Mar 7 '12 at 7:08
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The answer is trivial, using GROUP BY:

SELECT country_code,MIN(name)
FROM country_phone_codes
GROUP BY country_code;

The DISTINCT function and ORDER BY aren’t necessary with GROUP BY. As the original question specifically pertained to MySQL, the MIN() aggregate function isn’t necessary and you might see better performance without it if all of the following are true:

  • The server is MySQL
  • The storage engine is InnoDB
  • The first column of the example data is the primary key and the entries follow the same ordering suggested by the small sample, namely, the country name appears before all other names in the group.

This works because the InnoDB storage engine will scan in the order of the primary key and, for nonaggregated columns, it will use the first value it finds.

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Although this is a working query in MySQL using name here is not allowed as you did not a) GROUP BY name or b) use an aggregate function like max(name) as name. –  Basti Mar 7 '12 at 6:40
1  
Again, DISTINCT is meaningless here with the given data. MAX() is entirely unrelated. –  danorton Mar 7 '12 at 6:45
1  
In standard SQL if you do a GROUP BY you are only allowed to use columns that are in the GROUP BY-statament or that you used aggregate functions on. If you don't care witch value get's selected or you know that they are all the same (through some implicit functional dependencies) you would select ANY(name). MySQL does not provide this aggregate function, so use MAX(name) instead. –  Basti Mar 7 '12 at 6:51
    
@Basti, you are mistaken. If you are convinced otherwise, please refer me to the section I missed in this document which I have read thoroughly: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/select.html –  danorton Mar 7 '12 at 6:57
    
@Basti, you’re half right. MySQL does provide an aggregate function, but it’s arbitrary and probably equivalent to ANY(). I have modified my answer to include the MIN() function on name. –  danorton Mar 7 '12 at 7:07
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To select distinct country_code, name pairs:

select country_code, name
from country_phone_codes
where country_code = area_code;
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As you seem to want to select those rows, where the area_code is the same as country_code, you could just select those rows where area_code and country_code are equal:

SELECT country_code, name
FROM country_phone_codes
WHERE area_code = country_code;

If there is possibility that there are multiple rows with the same area code and country code, you can use DISTINCT to select only one row for each (country_code, name) tuple.

SELECT DISTINCT country_code, name
FROM country_phone_codes
WHERE area_code = country_code;
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Seems like you have a one-to-many relationship between country_code and name.

If you do a simple GROUP BY query like

SELECT country_code,name FROM country_phone_codes GROUP BY country_code

you might end up with

country_code    name
-----------------------------
93            |  AFGHANISTAN
355           |  ALBANIA
213           |  ALGERIA
124           |  COUNTRY - MOBILE
-----------------------------

assuming all your country names are

COUNTRY
COUNTRY - SOMETHING
COUNTRY - SOMETHING - SOMETHING

would be better to use

SELECT country_code,MIN(name) FROM country_phone_codes GROUP BY country_code

so you end up with

country_code    name
-----------------------------
93            |  AFGHANISTAN
355           |  ALBANIA
213           |  ALGERIA
xxx           |  COUNTRY
-----------------------------

this is assuming that you have both of those records in your table

id     country_code     area_code     name
------------------------------------------------------------
xx   |   xxx          |  xx        |  COUNTRY
xx   |   xxx          |  xx        |  COUNTRY - SOMETHING
------------------------------------------------------------
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You need to group your country_code also then & then only you will get correct matching results.

SELECT country_code,name
FROM country_phone_codes 
group by country_code
ORDER BY country_code

And we should need to avoid use of Distinct in select clause as it gives performance issues. Instead of that we can use group by

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Although this is a working query in MySQL using name here is not allowed as you did not a) GROUP BY name or b) use an aggregate function like max(name) as name. –  Basti Mar 7 '12 at 6:40
    
if you are using oracle, it will not work. for mysql it will work. And this answer is for MYSQL as he asked –  Java Mar 7 '12 at 6:42
    
@Basti: sadly, it does work (when ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY setting is off, which is the default) in MySQL although it is not standard SQL. –  Salman A Mar 7 '12 at 6:43
    
@PravinG It is still no valid SQL statement. Just put max(name) AS name to get your +1. –  Basti Mar 7 '12 at 6:45
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