Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find out about the performance difference between normal multithreading and multithreading using executor (to maintain a thread pool).

The below are code examples for both.

Without Executor Code (with multithreading):

import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory;
import java.lang.management.MemoryPoolMXBean;
import java.lang.management.MemoryUsage;
import java.lang.management.ThreadMXBean;
import java.util.List;

public class Demo1 {
public static void main(String arg[]) {
    Demo1 demo = new Demo1();
    Thread t5  = new Thread(new Runnable() {
       public void run() {
              int count=0;
              // Thread.State;
              // System.out.println("ClientMsgReceiver started-----");
              Demo1.ChildDemo  obj = new Demo1.ChildDemo();
              while(true) {

                // System.out.println("Threadcount is"+Thread);
                // System.out.println("count is"+(count++));
                Thread t=new Thread(obj);
                t.start();
                ThreadMXBean tb = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
                List<MemoryPoolMXBean> pools = ManagementFactory.getMemoryPoolMXBeans();
                for (MemoryPoolMXBean pool : pools) {
                   MemoryUsage peak = pool.getPeakUsage();
                   System.out.format("Peak %s memory used: %,d%n",
                             pool.getName(), peak.getUsed());
                   System.out.format("Peak %s memory reserved: %,d%n",
                             pool.getName(), peak.getCommitted());
                } 

                System.out.println("Current Thread Count"+ tb.getThreadCount());
                System.out.println("Peak Thread Count"+ tb.getPeakThreadCount());
                System.out.println("Current_Thread_Cpu_Time " 
                         + tb.getCurrentThreadCpuTime());
                System.out.println("Daemon Thread Count" +tb.getDaemonThreadCount());
       }
       // ChatLogin = new ChatLogin();
     }
  });
  t5.start();
}

static class ChildDemo implements Runnable {
   public void run() {
        try {
        //  System.out.println("Thread Started with custom Run method");
            Thread.sleep(100000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally {
            System.out.println("A" +Thread.activeCount());
        }
    }
  }
}

With executor (multithreading):

import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory;
import java.lang.management.MemoryPoolMXBean;
import java.lang.management.MemoryUsage;
import java.lang.management.ThreadMXBean;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class Executor_Demo {
public static void main(String arg[]) {
   BlockingQueue<Runnable> queue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Runnable>(10);
   ThreadPoolExecutor executor   = new ThreadPoolExecutor(
          10, 100, 10, TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS, queue);
   Executor_Demo demo = new Executor_Demo();

   executor.execute(new Runnable() {
       public void run() {
          int count=0;
          // System.out.println("ClientMsgReceiver started-----");
          Executor_Demo.Demo demo2 = new Executor_Demo.Demo();
          BlockingQueue<Runnable> queue1 = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Runnable>(1000);
          ThreadPoolExecutor executor1   = new ThreadPoolExecutor(
                  1000, 10000, 10, TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS, queue1);

          while(true) {
             // System.out.println("Threadcount is"+Thread);
             // System.out.println("count is"+(count++));
             Runnable command= new Demo();
             // executor1.execute(command);
             executor1.submit(command);         
             // Thread t=new Thread(demo2);
             // t.start();
             ThreadMXBean tb = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
             /* try {
                  executor1.awaitTermination(100, TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                   // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                   e.printStackTrace();
                } */
              List<MemoryPoolMXBean> pools = ManagementFactory.getMemoryPoolMXBeans();
              for (MemoryPoolMXBean pool : pools) {
                 MemoryUsage peak = pool.getPeakUsage();
                 System.out.format("Peak %s memory used: %,d%n",
                          pool.getName(), peak.getUsed());
                 System.out.format("Peak %s memory reserved: %,d%n",
                          pool.getName(), peak.getCommitted());
          }
              System.out.println("daemon threads"+tb.getDaemonThreadCount());
              System.out.println("All threads"+tb.getAllThreadIds());
              System.out.println("current thread CPU time "
                       + tb.getCurrentThreadCpuTime());
              System.out.println("current thread user time "
                       + tb.getCurrentThreadUserTime());
              System.out.println("Total started thread count " 
                       + tb.getTotalStartedThreadCount());
              System.out.println("Current Thread Count"+ tb.getThreadCount());
              System.out.println("Peak Thread Count"+ tb.getPeakThreadCount());
              System.out.println("Current_Thread_Cpu_Time " 
                       + tb.getCurrentThreadCpuTime());
              System.out.println("Daemon Thread Count"
                       + tb.getDaemonThreadCount());
              // executor1.shutdown();  
            }
            //ChatLogin = new ChatLogin();
          }
     });
     executor.shutdown();
}

static class Demo implements Runnable {
    public void run() {
      try {
        // System.out.println("Thread Started with custom Run method");
        Thread.sleep(100000);
      } catch (InterruptedException e) {
          // TODO Auto-generated catch block
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
      finally {
         System.out.println("A" +Thread.activeCount());
      }
   }
  }
}

Sample output Output

When I run both programs, it turns out the executor is more expensive than normal multithreading. why is this so?

And given this, what is the use of executor exactly? We use the executor to manage thread pools.

I would have expected the executor to give better results than normal multithreading.

Basically I'm doing this as I need to handle millions of clients using socket programming with multithreading.

Any suggestions will be helpful.

share|improve this question
    
"Millions of clients" all at once? How many concurrent connections do you need to maintain? –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '12 at 7:27
1  
Well to start with I wouldn't try doing that on one machine, and I wouldn't even think about doing that with a thread per client, with or without an executor. The first thing you need to look at is asynchronous IO... at which point you may be able to work with very few threads. Also, when performing benchmarking, I'd choose a more realistic test - in your real code you're not just going to loop continuously adding more threads which do nothing but sleep, are you? –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '12 at 7:30
1  
Test the server to determine how many connection you can safely accept and then only allow that many. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 7 '12 at 8:06
1  
@PravinG: That sounds like a completely different area, to me - I suggest you ask a separate question for it. (There are ways of finding out how much memory you're using, but it's relatively complex to work out when to stop accepting requests.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '12 at 10:28
1  
@PravinG: Your benchmark is entirely unrealistic, so the results are meaningless. In reality, you wouldn't want a huge number of threads. Make your benchmark realistic, and you'll get more useful numbers. –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '12 at 10:40
show 5 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To see how something scales, I would try to keep the cost of monitoring to a minimum and I would compare a small number to a large number.

public class Executor_Demo {
    public static void main(String... arg) throws ExecutionException, InterruptedException {
        int nThreads = 5100;
        ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(nThreads, new DaemonThreadFactory());

        List<Future<Results>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<Results>>();
        for (int i = 0; i < nThreads; i++) {
            futures.add(executor.submit(new BackgroundCallable()));
        }
        Results result = new Results();
        for (Future<Results> future : futures) {
            result.merge(future.get());
        }
        executor.shutdown();

        result.print(System.out);

    }

    static class Results {
        private long cpuTime;
        private long userTime;

        Results() {
            final ThreadMXBean tb = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
            cpuTime = tb.getCurrentThreadCpuTime();
            userTime = tb.getCurrentThreadUserTime();
        }


        public void merge(Results results) {
            cpuTime += results.cpuTime;
            userTime += results.userTime;
        }

        public void print(PrintStream out) {
            ThreadMXBean tb = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();

            List<MemoryPoolMXBean> pools = ManagementFactory.getMemoryPoolMXBeans();
            for (int i = 0, poolsSize = pools.size(); i < poolsSize; i++) {
                MemoryPoolMXBean pool = pools.get(i);
                MemoryUsage peak = pool.getPeakUsage();
                out.format("Peak %s memory used:\t%,d%n", pool.getName(), peak.getUsed());
                out.format("Peak %s memory reserved:\t%,d%n", pool.getName(), peak.getCommitted());
            }

            out.println("Total thread CPU time\t" + cpuTime);
            out.println("Total thread user time\t" + userTime);
            out.println("Total started thread count\t" + tb.getTotalStartedThreadCount());
            out.println("Current Thread Count\t" + tb.getThreadCount());
            out.println("Peak Thread Count\t" + tb.getPeakThreadCount());
            out.println("Daemon Thread Count\t" + tb.getDaemonThreadCount());
        }
    }

    static class DaemonThreadFactory implements ThreadFactory {
        @Override
        public Thread newThread(Runnable r) {
            Thread t = new Thread(r);
            t.setDaemon(true);
            return t;
        }
    }

    static class BackgroundCallable implements Callable<Results> {
        @Override
        public Results call() throws Exception {
            Thread.sleep(100);
            return new Results();
        }
    }
}

when tested with -XX:MaxNewSize=64m (this limits the size temporary memory spaces will increase)

100 threads
Peak Code Cache memory used:    386,880
Peak Code Cache memory reserved:    2,555,904
Peak PS Eden Space memory used: 41,280,984
Peak PS Eden Space memory reserved: 50,331,648
Peak PS Survivor Space memory used: 0
Peak PS Survivor Space memory reserved: 8,388,608
Peak PS Old Gen memory used:    0
Peak PS Old Gen memory reserved:    192,675,840
Peak PS Perm Gen memory used:   3,719,616
Peak PS Perm Gen memory reserved:   21,757,952
Total thread CPU time   20000000
Total thread user time  20000000
Total started thread count  105
Current Thread Count    93
Peak Thread Count   105
Daemon Thread Count 92

5100 threads
Peak Code Cache memory used:    425,728
Peak Code Cache memory reserved:    2,555,904
Peak PS Eden Space memory used: 59,244,544
Peak PS Eden Space memory reserved: 59,244,544
Peak PS Survivor Space memory used: 2,949,152
Peak PS Survivor Space memory reserved: 8,388,608
Peak PS Old Gen memory used:    3,076,400
Peak PS Old Gen memory reserved:    192,675,840
Peak PS Perm Gen memory used:   3,787,096
Peak PS Perm Gen memory reserved:   21,757,952
Total thread CPU time   810000000
Total thread user time  150000000
Total started thread count  5105
Current Thread Count    5105
Peak Thread Count   5105
Daemon Thread Count 5104

The main increase is the increase in old gen used ~ 3 MB or about 6 KB per thread. and the CPU used by 956 ms or about 0.2 ms per thread.


In your first example, you are creating one thread, in the second you are creating 1000.

The output you are performing appears to be most of the work and you have much more output in the second case than the first.

You need to be sure your testing and monitoring is far more light weight than want you are trying to monitor/measure.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but to clarify: the benchmark is invalid –  Jim Garrison Mar 7 '12 at 8:07
    
@JimGarrison the benchmark indicates the second approach of monitoring is slower than the first. You have to be careful as to what you are measuring. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 7 '12 at 8:27
    
In second case it's not creating 1000 threads. It's already created a pool of 1000 threads. exector.submit() will submit the task to one of the thread from executor thread pool. @PeterLawrey correct me if I am wrong. –  Java Mar 7 '12 at 8:46
    
My point is that its a difference which may or may not have an impact which is unnecessary, you could have made the minimum 1 for example. To come two things, you want to minimise the number of differences so you can have confidence in what a result means. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 7 '12 at 9:01
    
Peter i am planning to use executor in my chat app but when i created this POC(above code) and when i test run it i got results which i have attached as image for your reference. Can you please comment about the results . as per my knowledge executor seems to be expensive in usage of time and memory. \ –  Java Mar 7 '12 at 9:25
show 3 more comments

Each thread consumes memory for stack, something from 256K to 1M. You can set stack size manually, but it is dangerous to set it below 128K. So If you have 2G memory and can afford to spend 1/2 for threads, you'll have no more than 8K threads. If this is ok for you, use normal multithreading (each Runnable has its own stack). If you are not willing or not able to spend so much memory for each Runnable, use Executor. Set thread pool size to the number of processors (Runtime.availableProcessors()), or several times more. The main problem arise, is that you cannot make Thread.sleep() or otherwise block thread in you runnable (say, wait for user response), because such blocking effectively excludes the thread from servicing. As a result, if you use thread pool of limited size, so called "thread starvation" occur, which is effectively a deadlock. If your thread pool is of unlimited size, then you fall back to normal multithreading and soon run out of memory.

The cure is to use asynchonous operations, that is, setup some request with your callback, and exit the run() method. The callback should then start execution of some Runnable object (maybe the same) with Executor.execute(Runnable), or it can execute the method runnable.run() itself.

Asynchronous input-output operations are present now in Java 7 (nio2), but I failed to make it serve more than several hundreds of network connections. For servicing network connections, asynchronous network libraries can be used (e.g. Apache Netty).

Organizing callbacks and execution of runnables may require sophisticated synchronization. To make life easier, consider to use Actor model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actor_model), where Actor is a Runnable executing each time when an input message arrive. Numerous Java Actor libraries exist (e.g https://github.com/rfqu/df4j).

share|improve this answer
    
As per your answer if the executor should used for less time and memory usage, then why executor is using more time and memory in executor example than normal threading example.see my sample output image. –  Java Mar 7 '12 at 10:05
    
I never told that executor should use less time. I told that executor can use less threads (and hence less memory), but your samples show you use large number of threads in executor example, so your example is badly designed. –  Alexei Kaigorodov Mar 7 '12 at 11:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.