Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on fixing a database and have a script for correcting several tables. For example, this works fine:

mysql -u $U -p$P -D$D <<< 'ALTER TABLE xyz_tablename DROP columnname ;'

I'm not really a SQL ace so I'm not sure how to fix this one, and I'm running into a syntax error when I try this

mysql -u $U -p$P -D$D <<< 'ALTER TABLE drupal_url_alias CHANGE language language VARCHAR( 12 ) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT '';'

This SQL statement works fine:

ALTER TABLE drupal_url_alias CHANGE language language VARCHAR( 12 ) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT ''

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that your SQL statement contains single quotes and is placed in single quotes. This confuses the shell about where one quoted string ends and a new one starts.

Try this:

mysql -u $U -p$P -D$D <<< "ALTER TABLE drupal_url_alias CHANGE language language VARCHAR( 12 ) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT '';"

I have placed the statement in double quotes. Note that double quotes are not equivalent to single quotes (e.g. variable interpolation takes place in double quotes, but not in single quotes), but in your particular case the only difference is that single quotes after DEFAULT are kept intact.

share|improve this answer
    
I figured it wasn't something simple I was missing. I had tried double quotes but in the wrong position. Cheers... –  markwk Mar 7 '12 at 11:49

You can't have a single quote inside a single quote in Bash.

share|improve this answer

You must use ":

mysql -u $U -p$P -D$D <<< "ALTER TABLE drupal_url_alias CHANGE language language VARCHAR( 12 ) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT '';"
share|improve this answer
    
Um, no. There is no way to put single quotes inside a single quoted string in Bash. –  l0b0 Mar 7 '12 at 9:56
    
+1 for offering both the generic anwser (escape the character) and the mysql (and some other RDBMS) specific method to address this (mixing quote types). The top option will work in any RDBMS I have ever used as well as being the solution for hte same issue in almost every programming language. The bottom one is easy to use in some situations –  Karl Mar 7 '12 at 9:59
    
@l0b0, shame on me, you're right. Sometimes i forget that perl and shell differ in this aspect –  darkmist Mar 7 '12 at 10:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.