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Could someone please explain the below query? ID is not PK and there can be multiple rows for same ID. This query gets latest row.

SELECT ID, SCORE, DATE_OF_SCORE FROM
(
SELECT ID, SCORE, DATE_OF_SCORE, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY ID ORDER BY DATE_OF_SCORE DESC) RN
FROM PERSON_SCORE_DETAILS
WHERE ID = 123
)
WHERE RN = 1;
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@downvoter please explain. –  Vaandu Mar 7 '12 at 10:05
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This query selects the score at the most recent date_of_score for id 123. The partition by clause here is redundant since you are only selecting one id.

And this type of query is better handled by using an aggregate, like this:

select id
     , max(score) keep (dense_rank last order by date_of_score) score
     , max(date_of_score) date_of_score
  from person_score_details
 where id = 123
 group by id

Or even simpler:

select 123
     , max(score) keep (dense_rank last order by date_of_score) score
     , max(date_of_score) date_of_score
  from person_score_details
 where id = 123

Regards,
Rob.

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+1 I didn't spot that the inner query only selected records for a single ID. –  APC Mar 7 '12 at 10:06
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ROW_NUMBER() is an analytic function, in this case a function returning a distinct number for each row. The PARTITION clause controls the window in which the row number is generated, and the ORDER BY determines the sorting of rows within that partition.

So, as you observed the inner query produces a number for each row, resetting that number for the start of each run of records for a given ID and sorting them in reverse date order. This means the latest record for each ID has a row number of 1. The outer query filteres on the alias of that function, RN, to produce a result set comprising only the latest records for all IDs.

Analytic functions differ from aggregate functions (i.e. GROUP BY) in that we can use them without having to partition by all the columns in the projection. This makes them useful in queries when we want to return other columns.

The Oracle documentation is comprehensive, online and free. You should learn to navigate it. Find out more about analytic functions here.

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