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I'm trying to reverse-engineer some JavaScript and, annoyingly, the JS isn't terribly clear or well-documented. I've got a series of events that are fired (using JQuery) that I need to find where the function lives.

Is there a way of configuring Firebug (or the Opera/IE consoles - not Chrome/Safari) so that I can see what events are fired when I click a button?

Thanks

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you shoud accept an answer to mark this question as solved... –  Christoph Mar 26 '12 at 12:59
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

In firebug, select console tab. Click on profile, do your activity on page, again click on profile...list of called function will be listed below in firebug panel.

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Perfect. Thanks –  RiggerTheGeek Mar 8 '12 at 10:27
    
if u got answer then choose your answer and close this question.. –  sandeep Mar 8 '12 at 10:35
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I suggest that you get started with the "Using FireBug Console for Faster JavaScript Development" tutorial.

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You could add a console.log() to every click method. Or simply add an Event listener to the document and console.log() some details or the event when something is clicked.

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Alas, I'm reverse engineering a load of undocumented and minified code. So I don't have that option –  RiggerTheGeek Mar 8 '12 at 10:26
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You can use the Firebug Profiler, e.g. by calling profile() in the console before your action and profileEnd() after the action. Firebug will then tell you which methods have been executed in the meantime (incl. lots of information about it).

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