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I have some template string

this is my {0} template {1} string

which I plan to put user values in using String.Format().

The string actually is longer so for readability I use:

this is my {goodName1} template {goodName2} string

And then String.Replace each parameter with its value.

How can I get the highest performance and readability?

Maybe I should not have this template in a file (as now) but dynamically build it by concatanating to a string builder and adding the params when required? Although it's less readable.

What's my other options?

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It's a pity this question turned into a debate about speed. The repleated String.Replace solution has a worse problem. If the replacement text also contains substrings of the form {goodNameN} then will they be expanded or not? It turns out it depends on the order in which the replacements are done. This is the kind of subtle fuzziness than can lie harmless for years and then bite in mysterious ways long after the code is forgotten. –  Adrian Ratnapala Oct 9 '13 at 13:53
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9 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

From Atwood: It. Just. Doesn't. Matter.

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16  
Have to disagree - it can matter. Just make sure it matters before optimising, rather than assuming so. –  Brian Nov 9 '10 at 12:01
3  
Sometimes it really does matter... as in this case where Replace was tuned from 20 seconds to 0.1... codeproject.com/Articles/298519/… –  Eric J. Jul 11 '12 at 21:52
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You can put the parameters in a dictionary and use the Regex.Replace method to replace all of the parameters in one replacement. That way the method scales well if the template string gets long or the number of parameters grows.

Example:

Dictionary<string, string> parameters = new Dictionary<string, string>();
parameters.Add("goodName1", "asdf");
parameters.Add("goodName2", "qwerty");
string text = "this is my {goodName1} template {goodName2} string";
text = Regex.Replace(text, @"\{(.+?)\}", m => parameters[m.Groups[1].Value]);
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This solution is the most performant, you should use an extension method of some sort to take care of non-existant keys when looking up the dictionary though. –  Yann Schwartz Jun 6 '09 at 16:00
    
And \{([^}]+)\} is faster than using the non-greedy operator. –  Yann Schwartz Jun 6 '09 at 16:01
    
@Guffa - A good note to point out is m.Value should be m.Groups[1].Value as well. m.Value returns the same as m.Groups[0].Value which is the entire part matched. –  Zack Jan 14 '12 at 20:01
    
@Zack: Yes, you are right. I corrected the code. –  Guffa Jan 14 '12 at 20:35
1  
harder to read, regex has no massive speed benefit and is makes it even more harder to read let alone script. It just doesn't matter - I spent too much time optimizing and getting 0.1ms speed boost. yay- and my code looked worse than assembler language. string.replace works great, is readable and even juniors understand it. But it must never be used in massive loops –  ppumkin Mar 26 '13 at 13:14
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Like anything, it depends. If the code is going to be called millions of times every day, then think about performance. If it's a few times a day then go for readability.

I've done some benchmarking between using normal (immutable) strings and StringBuilder. Until you start doing a huge amount in small bit of time, you don't need to worry about it too much.

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1  
I agree with Iain. For more information check out this article on Code Project: codeproject.com/KB/string/string.aspx –  Kane Jun 6 '09 at 15:42
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My spontaneous solution would look like this:

string data = "This is a {template1} that is {template2}.";

Dictionary<string, string> replacements = new Dictionary<string, string>(){
    {"{template1}", "car"},
    {"{template2}", "red"},
};

foreach (string key in replacements.Keys)
{
    data = data.Replace(key, replacements[key]);
}
Console.WriteLine(data); // outputs "This is a car that is red."

I have used this kind of template replacements in several real-world projects and have never found it to be a performance issue. Since it's easy to use and understand, I have not seen any reason to change it a lot.

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BEWARE of getting bogged down with this type of thinking. Unless this code is running hundreds of time per minute and the template file is several K in size, it is more important to get it done. Do not waste a minute thinking about problems like this. In general, if you are doing a lot with string manipulations, then use a string builder. It even has a Replace method. But, why bother. When you are done, and IF you find that you have a performance problem, use PerfMon and fix the REAL bottlenecks at that time.

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The fastest way to do it is with a StringBuilder using individual calls to StringBuilder.Append(), like this:

string result = new StringBuilder("this is my ")
                 .Append(UserVar1)
                 .Append(" template ")
                 .Append(UserVar2)
                 .Append(" string")
                 .ToString();

I've thoroughly benchmarked the framework code, and this will be fastest. If you want to improve readability you could keep a separate string to show the user, and just use this in the background.

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2  
You don't need to do this. The C# compiler will compile this exactly the same as if you just did string result = "this is my " + UserVar1 + " template " + UserVar2 + " string" –  Nick Whaley Nov 27 '12 at 21:35
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The same thing above that Fredrick posted above, but with linq.

    public static string FindandReplace(this string inputText, Dictionary<string, string> placeHolderValues)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(inputText))
        {
            return placeHolderValues.Keys.Aggregate(inputText, (current, key) => current.Replace(key, placeHolderValues[key]));
        }
        else return inputText;
    }
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If you need a good, fast, but simple template engine, you should check out StringTemplate. For simple templates that don't require any logic or flow control in the template itself, StringTemplate is GREAT.

http://www.stringtemplate.org/download.html

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Just modified the above answer to the following:

    string data = "This is a {template1} that is {template2}.";

    Dictionary<string, string> replacements = new Dictionary<string, string>(){
        {"{template1}", "car"},
        {"{template2}", "red"},
    };

    data.Parse(replacements);

Extension method:

public static class Parser
{
    public static string Parse(this string template, Dictionary<string, string> replacements)
    {
        if (replacements.Count > 0)
        {
            template = replacements.Keys
                        .Aggregate(template, (current, key) => current.Replace(key, replacements[key]));
        }
        return template;
    }
}

Hope this helps.. :)

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