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In our project we use the c++ stream operator (<<) in our object model to print out an easy readible format of the data. A simplified example is this:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream & oStream, const OwnClass& iOwnClass) {
    oStream << "[SomeMember1: " << iOwnClass._ownMember1 << "]\n";
    oStream << "[SomeMember2: " << iOwnClass._ownMember2 << "]\n";
}

Resulting in this in the logging:

[SomeMember1: foo]
[SomeMember2: bar]

What we want now is to be able to indent the result of that operator. Some calling class might not want the result like this, but want to add 2 spaces indention before each line. We could add a member to our class specifying the indention, but that does not seem to be an elegant solution.

Of course this is not a very big issue, but our logging would be so much nicer if this would work.

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The simplest solution is to slip a filtering streambuf between the ostream and the actual streambuf. Something like:

class IndentingOStreambuf : public std::streambuf
{
    std::streambuf*     myDest;
    bool                myIsAtStartOfLine;
    std::string         myIndent;
    std::ostream*       myOwner;
protected:
    virtual int         overflow( int ch )
    {
        if ( myIsAtStartOfLine && ch != '\n' ) {
            myDest->sputn( myIndent.data(), myIndent.size() );
        }
        myIsAtStartOfLine = ch == '\n';
        return myDest->sputc( ch );
    }
public:
    explicit            IndentingOStreambuf( 
                            std::streambuf* dest, int indent = 4 )
        : myDest( dest )
        , myIsAtStartOfLine( true )
        , myIndent( indent, ' ' )
        , myOwner( NULL )
    {
    }
    explicit            IndentingOStreambuf(
                            std::ostream& dest, int indent = 4 )
        : myDest( dest.rdbuf() )
        , myIsAtStartOfLine( true )
        , myIndent( indent, ' ' )
        , myOwner( &dest )
    {
        myOwner->rdbuf( this );
    }
    virtual             ~IndentingOStreambuf()
    {
        if ( myOwner != NULL ) {
            myOwner->rdbuf( myDest );
        }
    }
};

To insert, just create an instance of the streambuf:

IndentingOStreambuf indent( std::cout );
//  Indented output...

When indent goes out of scope, everything returns to normal.

(For logging, I have one that is a bit more complex: the LoggingOStreambuf takes __FILE__ and __LINE__ as arguments, sets myIndent to a formatted string with these arguments, plus a time stamp, resets it to an indentation string after each output, collects all of the output in an std::ostringstream, and outputs it atomically to myDest in the destructor.)

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Worked perfectly! I made a few changes though, like adding an increaseIndent and decreaseIndent method. My logs look exactly how I want them now. Thanks. –  W. Goeman Mar 7 '12 at 14:04
    
@James: Would you have the more complex code available as well please? –  Cookie Jun 5 at 8:32
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This can be done using a custom stream-manipulator that stores the desired indentation-level in a word of the internal extensible array of the stream. You can request such a word using the function ios_base::xalloc. This function will give you the index of your word. You can access it using ios_base::iword. One way to implement that would be this:

struct indent {
    indent(int level) : level(level) {}
private:
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, const indent& val);

    int level;
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, const indent& val) {
    for(int i = 0; i < val.level; i++) {
        stream << " ";
    }
    return stream;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream & oStream, const OwnClass& iOwnClass) {
    oStream << indent(oStream.iword(index)) << "[SomeMember1: " << 
               iOwnClass._ownMember1 << "]\n";
    oStream << indent(oStream.iword(index)) << "[SomeMember2: " << 
               iOwnClass._ownMember2 << "]\n";
}

You'd have to figure out where to store the index. This effectively allows you to add custom state to the stream (note that this would not be thread-safe out-of-the-box). Every function that wants indentation should add the requested indentation to the stream, and subtract it again when it is done. You could make sure this always happen by using a guard to add/subtract the desired indent (IMHO this is more elegant than using a manipulator):

class indent_guard {
public:
    indent_guard(int level, std::ostream& stream, int index) 
    : level(level),
      stream(stream),
      index(index)
    {
        stream.iword(index) += level;
    }

    ~indent_guard() {
        stream.iword(index) -= level;
    }

 private:
     int level;
     std::ostream& stream;
     int index;
};

You could use it like this:

void some_func() {
    indent_guard(2, std::cout, index);

    // all output inside this function will be indented by 2 spaces

    some_func(); // recursive call - output will be indented by 4 spaces

    // here it will be 2 spaces again
}
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At least you do know iostream:-). This is clearly the way to handle any special manipulators for custom classes. It doesn't help if the first output is not a type defined by yourself; in such cases, you need to intercept the output at the streambuf level. –  James Kanze Mar 7 '12 at 11:42
    
This did not entirely solve my problem, but is certainly a "good to know". Thanks. –  W. Goeman Mar 7 '12 at 14:02
    
Your some_func() is going to cause a stack overflow. –  uckelman Aug 24 '13 at 11:50
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Not so good way to do this is to add a global variable, which tells the indentation. Something like this :

std::string OwnClassIndentation;
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream & oStream, const OwnClass& iOwnClass) {
    oStream << "[SomeMember1:" << OwnClassIndentation << iOwnClass._ownMember1 << "]\n";
    oStream << "[SomeMember2:" << OwnClassIndentation << iOwnClass._ownMember2 << "]\n";
}

And then set it as appropriate.

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2  
If you only want the indentation when outputting a specific type, whose operator<< you define, then you can use std::ios_base::xalloc and std::ios_base::iword to maintain a per stream indentation. If you want the indentation even when outputting dest << "some string", however, you'll need to use a filtering streambuf. –  James Kanze Mar 7 '12 at 11:39
    
@JamesKanze: Good point - the same applies to my solution - didn't think of that. –  Björn Pollex Mar 7 '12 at 11:41
    
This would certainly work, but I really dont like global variables, especially when they are only needed to format my logs :) –  W. Goeman Mar 7 '12 at 14:06
    
@W.Goemann That's why I said it is not really good way ;) –  BЈовић Mar 7 '12 at 14:15
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You can make your own stream class that has an indentation variable and override the endl for that class, inserting the indentation.

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1  
Which won't indent the first output (may or may not be a feature), will insert spaces after the last line (undefined behavior if the file is open in text mode), and won't indent when '\n' is output. And of course, you'll have to define all of the << operators as well. This is a job for the streambuf, not the ostream class. –  James Kanze Mar 7 '12 at 11:37
    
I thought about this too, but the ostream I have to write to, is not in my hands, so I can not change its' type. I must use the ostream from our logging lib. The streambuf worked. –  W. Goeman Mar 7 '12 at 14:07
    
@W. Goeman: you can derive from ostream, it has virtual methods. –  Dani Mar 7 '12 at 16:25
    
@Dani: I know I can derive ostream. Suppose I implement "myostream" from it, the stream I will be writing to will never be myostream. I am writing to an ostream given to me by another library. –  W. Goeman Mar 9 '12 at 9:11
    
@W. Goeman: you can make mystream take another stream as an argument and act as a proxy –  Dani Mar 9 '12 at 12:18
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