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I'm making a navigation menu, should I be using the <nav> element or <ul> element for that?

If I use a nav I'll prob need to use a shiv so that it works across browsers.

If that's so, what the advantage of using a nav over a ul?

EDIT:

I know you can put a ul into a nav my question is why use a nav at all?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Dont get confuse with nav and ul they both can be used together for a navigation menu.

Nav is a HTML5 property if you are creating something in html5 you can use NAV there is no restriction.but not all browser renders this correctly

 <nav>
    <ul>
    <li><a href="default.asp">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="news.asp">News</a></li>
    <li><a href="contact.asp">Contact</a></li>
    <li><a href="about.asp">About</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>
  1. Read about Html 5

UL creates an unordered list. The unordered part means that the items in the list are not in any particular order. nav also use ul to shows link.

read normal html tags here and see how they work Html tags

<ul>
<li><a href="default.asp">Home</a></li>
<li><a href="news.asp">News</a></li>
<li><a href="contact.asp">Contact</a></li>
<li><a href="about.asp">About</a></li>
</ul>

This will create a navigation bar you have to put some CSS styles to look it better.

the above both code will produce same result the difference is nav is html5 property which says the element is for navigation purpose

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1  
Will it be less SEO friendly if I don't use nav? If not then I don't see any advantage of nav –  qwertymk Mar 7 '12 at 13:25
    
@qwertymk as I said, no there is no SEO-advantage (at the moment) and also not in the foreseeable future. –  Christoph Mar 8 '12 at 8:34

The nav element is semantically more specific, so generally the better choice. A search engine, for example, will understand that the links within it represent navigation, rather than a simple list of links (which could be recommended posts, or related items etc).

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nav is an semantic html5-element, which was introduced to point out, that this code is the navigation of your page. For "normal nonsemantic" search engines it makes no difference wether you use ul or nav. They will understand both without problems. At the moment using those semantic elements creates no real advantage for you.

Be careful, using those html5-elements breaks IE, so you need to "register" them, so IE recognizes them as stylable html-elements.

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You should generally use a list inside a <nav> anyway, like so:

<nav>
  <ul>
    <li>...</li>
  </ul>
</nav>
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Depends on the case but most of the time you'll be using both.

<nav>
    <ul>
        <li><a href="#">item1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">item2</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">item3</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">item4</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">item5</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>

<!-- Or just links -->

<nav>
    <a href="#">Item</a>
    <a href="#">Item</a>
    <a href="#">Item</a>
</nav>

Both are semantically correct.

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If you want to use nav but avoid any issues with browsers that don't support it, the simplest thing to do is not apply any styling to it and wrap it in a div.

<div id="nav">
    <nav>
        <ul>
            <li><a href="?">List Item Link</a></li>
            <li><a href="?">List Item Link</a></li>
            <li><a href="?">List Item Link</a></li>
        </ul>
    </nav>
</div>  

The search engine optimisation benefits of nav have been mentioned in other posts

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This will work in browsers that don't support it? Always? –  qwertymk Mar 7 '12 at 16:10
    
I don't know a definitive answer to this, I haven't performed extensive testing or anything. Put it this way, it works in all the browsers I've ever used and that's a lot - I hope that's helpful, perhaps someone else may provide some insight into this. –  MattyF Mar 7 '12 at 18:42
    
Further information can be found here stackoverflow.com/questions/5367526/… –  MattyF Mar 7 '12 at 18:56

Just my opinion, I would use a ul simply for the reason that IE 6 and 7 still have a sizable market share, and I know I won't have to jump through hoops to get a ul to work. For now anyway, it's simpler.

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