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In some machine there are almost five millions of small (50KB) text files. I need to send them to another machine on our LAN. I tried doing

scp *.txt remote_machine:

since ssh connection is setup passwordless between them. But a new connection is established for each file, so it is painstakingly slow.

I wonder therefore what would be the best strategy for doing this.

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1  
That command does not establish a connection for every file. It goes slow because of scp protocol internals: it is too talky. – salva Mar 7 '12 at 12:04
    
ok, thanks for the info – flow Mar 7 '12 at 12:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure if scp is multi-threaded. If not try something like this so better utilize all cores/ cpus and network bandwidth:

scp [A-M]*.txt remote_machine:
scp [M-Z]*.txt remote_machine:
scp [0-9]*.txt remote_machine:
...

Of course the patterns to use depend on the naming of your files.

Instead of scp you could also use rsync with the same approach.

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I think yours is the easiest, simplest and most effective approach from all the answers (also the others are very good options) – flow Mar 8 '12 at 7:57

You can make a files.tar.gz file before transferring.

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yes, this is an option – flow Mar 7 '12 at 11:59
1  
it may pay off to use bzip2 or lzma also. – salva Mar 7 '12 at 12:07
1  
I have also found that bzip2 can run in parallel! – flow Mar 7 '12 at 12:17
    
actually, you can run everything in parallel: tar cf - $DIR | lzma -9 -c|ssh $HOST 'lzcat | tar xf -' – salva Mar 7 '12 at 12:35

well ssh also means encyption/decryption, why not you use ftp rather to transfer ... if security is not a real concern ?

more over, you can archive the data and decompress it after transfering ... if your network is slow.

so in short, issue the following command to make archive ..

cd /path/to/transfer/folder
tar -cvpjf /tmp/transfer.tar.bz2 .

to tranfer you will issue command

ftp open remotemachine
put /tmp/transfer.tar.bz2

on reciving, you will issue command in the folder you wanted to issue all...

cd /path/where/to/extract
tar -xvpjf ~/transfer.tar.bz2
rm ~/transfer.tar.bz2

definately you can automate it, i automated this process for me to transfer big chunk of data to a target ...

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.tar.gz the files together and un.tar.gz the files apart at the other end.

tar cz *.txt | ssh remote_machine 'tar xz'

Ssh itself slows things down. If you are copying between hosts on the same network and security isn't an issue, it may be better to use a raw tcp connection.

remote_machine$ nc -l 3333 -q 1 | tar xz
local_machine$ tar cz *.txt >/dev/tcp/remote_machine/3333

If you want to use a different port number from 3333, make sure you change it in both lines.

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