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Hi all!

I've been looking for a way to make my script more efficient and I've come to the conclusion (with help from the nice people here on StackOverflow) that Start-Job is the way to go.

I have the following foreach-loop that I would like to run simultanously on all the servers in $servers. I have problems understanding how I actually collect the information returned from Receive-Job and add to $serverlist.

PS: I know that I am far away from getting this nailed down, but I would really appreciate some help starting out as I am quite stumped on how Start-Job and Receive-Job works..

# List 4 servers (for testing)
$servers = Get-QADComputer -sizelimit 4 -WarningAction SilentlyContinue -OSName *server*,*hyper*

# Create list
$serverlistlist = @()

# Loop servers
foreach($server in $servers) {

    # Fetch IP
    $ipaddress = [System.Net.Dns]::GetHostAddresses($Server.name)| select-object IPAddressToString -expandproperty IPAddressToString

    # Gather OSName through WMI
    $OSName = (Get-WmiObject Win32_OperatingSystem -ComputerName $server.name ).caption

    # Ping the server
    if (Test-Connection -ComputerName $server.name -count 1 -Quiet ) {
        $reachable = "Yes"
    }

    # Save info about server
    $serverInfo = New-Object -TypeName PSObject -Property @{
        SystemName = ($server.name).ToLower()
        IPAddress = $IPAddress
        OSName = $OSName
    }
    $serverlist += $serverinfo | Select-Object SystemName,IPAddress,OSName
}

Notes

  • I am outputting $serverlist to a csv-file at the end of the script
  • I list aprox 500 servers in my full script
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since your loop only needs to work with a string it's easy to turn it into a concurrent script.

Below is an example of making making your loop use background jobs to speed up processing.

The code will loop through the array and spin up background jobs to run the code in the script block $sb. The $maxJobs variable controls how many jobs run at once and the $chunkSize variable controls how many servers each background job will process.

Add the rest of your processing in the script block adding whatever other properties you want to return to the PsObject.

$sb = {
    $serverInfos = @()
    $args | % {
        $IPAddress = [Net.Dns]::GetHostAddresses($_) | select -expand IPAddressToString
        # More processing here... 
        $serverInfos += New-Object -TypeName PsObject -Property @{ IPAddress = $IPAddress }
    }
    return $serverInfos
}

[string[]] $servers = Get-QADComputer -sizelimit 500 -WarningAction SilentlyContinue -OSName *server*,*hyper* | Select -Expand Name

$maxJobs = 10 # Max concurrent running jobs.
$chunkSize = 5 # Number of servers to process in a job.
$jobs = @()

# Process server list.
for ($i = 0 ; $i -le $servers.Count ; $i+=($chunkSize)) {
    if ($servers.Count - $i -le $chunkSize) 
        { $c = $servers.Count - $i } else { $c = $chunkSize }
    $c-- # Array is 0 indexed.

    # Spin up job.
    $jobs += Start-Job -ScriptBlock $sb -ArgumentList ( $servers[($i)..($i+$c)] ) 
    $running = @($jobs | ? {$_.State -eq 'Running'})

    # Throttle jobs.
    while ($running.Count -ge $maxJobs) {
        $finished = Wait-Job -Job $jobs -Any
        $running = @($jobs | ? {$_.State -eq 'Running'})
    }
}

# Wait for remaining.
Wait-Job -Job $jobs > $null

$jobs | Receive-Job | Select IPAddress

Here is the version that processes a single server per job:

$servers = Get-QADComputer -WarningAction SilentlyContinue -OSName *server*,*hyper*

# Create list
$serverlist = @()

$sb = {
    param ([string] $ServerName)
    try {
        # Fetch IP
        $ipaddress = [System.Net.Dns]::GetHostAddresses($ServerName)| select-object IPAddressToString -expandproperty IPAddressToString

        # Gather OSName through WMI
        $OSName = (Get-WmiObject Win32_OperatingSystem -ComputerName $ServerName ).caption

        # Ping the server
        if (Test-Connection -ComputerName $ServerName -count 1 -Quiet ) {
            $reachable = "Yes"
        }

        # Save info about server
        $serverInfo = New-Object -TypeName PSObject -Property @{
            SystemName = ($ServerName).ToLower()
            IPAddress = $IPAddress
            OSName = $OSName
        }
        return $serverInfo
    } catch {
        throw 'Failed to process server named {0}. The error was "{1}".' -f $ServerName, $_
    }
}

# Loop servers
$max = 5
$jobs = @()
foreach($server in $servers) {
    $jobs += Start-Job -ScriptBlock $sb -ArgumentList $server.Name
    $running = @($jobs | ? {$_.State -eq 'Running'})

    # Throttle jobs.
    while ($running.Count -ge $max) {
        $finished = Wait-Job -Job $jobs -Any
        $running = @($jobs | ? {$_.State -eq 'Running'})
    }
}

# Wait for remaining.
Wait-Job -Job $jobs > $null

# Check for failed jobs.
$failed = @($jobs | ? {$_.State -eq 'Failed'})
if ($failed.Count -gt 0) {
    $failed | % {
        $_.ChildJobs[0].JobStateInfo.Reason.Message
    }
}

# Collect job data.
$jobs | % {
    $serverlist += $_ | Receive-Job | Select-Object SystemName,IPAddress,OSName
}
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1  
Seems like that would eat you up in overhead creating the jobs. One job per server means you're going to have to load (and unload) powershell.exe 500 times before it gets through them all, and each job is only doing a trivial amount of work (finding the IP address and OS Name of 1 server). –  mjolinor Mar 8 '12 at 0:41
    
@mjolinor Depends on how long each iteration of the loop takes. I modified it a bit to send a chunk of servers to each background job. Thanks for your comment :) –  Andy Arismendi Mar 8 '12 at 5:31
    
Thank you very much! This is fantastic! I am performing quite a lot of commands on each server so I really don't need chunksize. Each job is also generating 5 csv files. I logged in last night and saw the code before you added the chunksize part. How would the code be without it? Thank you so much! This is fantastic:) –  Sune Mar 8 '12 at 14:23
1  
@Sune I re-added it. You can use the first one and set the chunk size to 1 or just use the original version. –  Andy Arismendi Mar 8 '12 at 14:58
1  
@Sune You'd have to put multiple objects in an array and return the array. –  Andy Arismendi Mar 9 '12 at 23:52
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Something you need to understand about Start-Job is that it starts a new instance of Powershell, running as a separate process. Receive-job gives you a mechanism to pull the output of that session back into your local session to work with it in your main script. Attractive as it might sound, running all of those simultaneously would mean starting up 500 instances of Powershell on your computer, all running at once. That's probably going to have some unintended consequences.

Here's one way to approach dividing up the work, if it helps:

Splits up a array of computer names into $n arrays, and starts a new job using each array as the argument list to the script block:

  $computers = gc c:\somedir\complist.txt
  $n = 6
  $complists = @{}
  $count = 0
  $computers |% {$complists[$count % $n] += @($_);$count++}

  0..($n-1) |% {
  start-job -scriptblock {gwmi win32_operatingsystem -computername $args} - argumentlist $complists[$_]
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! How about starting 20 jobs? Would that be doable? Or am I completely on the wrong track here? –  Sune Mar 7 '12 at 14:33
1  
20 might be do-able. It depnds on the computer and what else it's got going on while you're trying to run this. Basically it amounts to "will my computer handle starting up 20 more instances of Powersehll right now?" –  mjolinor Mar 7 '12 at 15:14
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