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I am trying to build some program that detects if a server of some game is on or off, I have the IP and the port of the server.

What do I have to do to detect whether the server is on or off? Sockets? Ping class?

It would be nice if you guys could give me a code sample or something.

Thank you very much!

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1  
    
You should just ping the server. But you must realize that you cannot say that the server is on or off. Say you ping a server, your packet might never reach the server and thus even if the server is online it never get the request and thus doesn't respond, so you think it's offline. the same goes when you do get a response the server might have crashed right after sending the response, so when you think it's online it might be offline. But in your case these uncertainties might be negligible. –  Terkel Mar 7 '12 at 12:10
    
@SimonBangTerkildsen I don't really understand in networking, why would that packet won't reach the server? My program should keep pinging the server until it becomes online. There should be a problem with that? –  idish Mar 7 '12 at 12:14
    
@idish: The packet may not reach the server because a firewall in front of the server may block pings. A better strategy is try to connect to the actual service. (Or, if you have a program like 'nmap', you can do a SYN-only probe.) –  David Schwartz Mar 7 '12 at 12:15
    
@DavidSchwartz I see, then it means that all my pings wouldn't reach the server right? Also, how do I connect to the actual service, and how much time would it take? Thank you. –  idish Mar 7 '12 at 12:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See Socket.Connect

public static void Connect1(string host, int port)
{
    IPAddress[] IPs = Dns.GetHostAddresses(host);

    Socket s = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork,
        SocketType.Stream,
        ProtocolType.Tcp);

    Console.WriteLine("Establishing Connection to {0}", 
        host);
    s.Connect(IPs[0], port); // Catch any exceptions here.
    Console.WriteLine("Connection established");
}   

By pinging a server you can get an indication whether the server is 'on' or 'off'; it doesn't give an indication whether the service you're trying to connect to is running or not.

if the first option is what you're looking for (a general idea whether the server is on&connected to the internet), pinging will suffice for this task.

As per the efficiency - pinging is more efficient (well, in large scale terms) as only 2 packets are being exchanged between the server and the client, rather than a full connection establishment which is about 3 packets - See TCP 3-Way handshake

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Thanks alot for you answer, tho I just need to check if the server is on or off, I don't really have to connect to it, So my question is: Whats more effective to do, your answer or JP Hellemons's answer(see comment) Thank you again! –  idish Mar 7 '12 at 12:07
    
@idish see edit –  Shai Mar 7 '12 at 12:16
    
I'd like to thank you very much for your answer, I really have to go now, once I will be back I will try that, thank you! –  idish Mar 7 '12 at 12:20

You can check if the server machine is turned on, but the server program is not running by trying to connect to it. If the server program is running you will be connected, but if it's not running you will get a "connection refused" error.

However, in most cases it's impossible to differ between the server machine being down, and the network between you and the server being down, as both these cases will most likely just result in a timeout.

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Maybe it's better to concentrate all connection logic into one manager and if connection will be broken, just inform client that server is down. It is wrong behaviour, to ping server all the time.

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