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I have a <div> element and I want to put a border on it. I know I can write style="border: 1px solid black", but this adds 2px to either side of the div, which is not what I want.

I would rather have this border be -1px from the edge of the div. The div itself is 100px x 100px, and if I add a border, then I have to do some mathematics to make the border appear.

Is there any way that I can make the border appear, and ensure the box will still be 100px (including the border)?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 244 down vote accepted

Set box-sizing property to border-box:

div {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    border: 20px solid #f00;
    background: #00f;
    margin: 10px;
}

div + div {
    border: 10px solid red;
}
<div>Hello!</div>
<div>Hello!</div>

It works on IE8 & above.

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11  
+1. For a little more background: css-tricks.com/box-sizing or paulirish.com/2012/box-sizing-border-box-ftw –  isotrope Mar 7 '12 at 14:00
23  
Only flaw with this one is you MUST declare a height for it to work, without a height the border still sits outside the block and affects rendering (i.e. vertical rhythm). –  jeremyclarke Oct 21 '13 at 13:30
1  
Would a min-height work? –  PsyKzz Jan 9 at 15:46
    
this does not allow styling individual border-sides, and in this case many would probably be happy with using the property outline. –  Lo Sauer Aug 10 at 8:05

Use pseudo element:

.button {
    background: #333;
    color: #fff;
    float: left;
    padding: 20px;
    margin: 20px;
    position: relative;
}

.button::after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    border: 5px solid #f00;
}
<div class='button'>Hello</div>

Using ::after you are styling the virtual last child of the selected element. content property creates an anonymous replaced element.

We are containing the pseudo element using absolute position relative to the parent. Then you have freedom to have whatever custom background and/or border in the background of your main element.

This approach does not affect placement of the contents of the main element, which is different from using box-sizing: border-box;.

Consider this example:

.parent {
    width: 200px;
}

.button {
    background: #333;
    color: #fff;
    padding: 20px;
    border: 5px solid #f00;
    border-left-width: 20px;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}
<div class='parent'>
    <div class='button'>Hello</div>
</div>

Here .button width is constrained using the parent element. Setting the border-left-width adjusts the content-box size and thus the position of the text.

.parent {
    width: 200px;
}

.button {
    background: #333;
    color: #fff;
    padding: 20px;
    position: relative;
}

.button::after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    border: 5px solid #f00;
    border-left-width: 20px;
}
<div class='parent'>
    <div class='button'>Hello</div>
</div>

Using the pseudo-element approach does not affect the content-box size.

Depending on the application, approach using a pseudo-element might or might not be a desirable behaviour.

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Yahoo! This is really possible. I found it.

For Bottom Border:

div {box-shadow: 0px -3px 0px red inset; }

For Top Border:

div {box-shadow: 0px 3px 0px red inset; }
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It Works!

div{
margin:-1px;
border:1px solid red;
}
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Probably it is belated answer, but I want to share with my findings. I found 2 new approaches to this problem that I have not found here in the answers:

Inner border through box-shadow css property

Yes, box-shadow is used to add box-shadows to the elements. But you can specify inset shadow, that would look like a inner border rather like a shadow. You just need to set horizontal and vertical shadows to 0px, and the "spread" property of the box-shadow to the width of the border you want to have. So for the 'inner' border of 10px you would write the following:

div{
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    background-color:yellow;
    box-shadow:0px 0px 0px 10px black inset;
    margin-bottom:20px;
}

Here is jsFiddle example that illustrates the difference between box-shadow border and 'normal' border. This way your border and the box width are of total 100px including the border.

More about box-shadow:here

Border through outline css property

Here is another approach, but this way the border would be outside of the box. Here is an example instead of 1000 words.. As follows from the example, you can use css outline property, to set the border that does not affect the width and height of the element. This way, the border width is not added to the width of an element.

div{
   width:100px;
   height:100px;
   background-color:yellow;
   outline:10px solid black;
}

More about outline: here

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+1 for outline, it's a very effective approach and even your w3schools page mentions: «IE8 supports the outline property only if a !DOCTYPE is specified.» –  Armfoot Jun 3 at 16:24

You can also use box-shadow like this:

div{
    -webkit-box-shadow:inset 0px 0px 0px 10px #f00;
    -moz-box-shadow:inset 0px 0px 0px 10px #f00;
    box-shadow:inset 0px 0px 0px 10px #f00;
}

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/nVyXS/ (hover to view border)

This works in modern browsers only. For example: No IE 8 support. See caniuse.com (box-shadow feature) for more info.

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2  
Love this solution because it keeps the border completely inside the box regardless of having a height set. Perfect if you want borders that have no effect at all outside the box. Here's the CSS for a top-border of 2px: "inset 0px 2px 0px 0px #DDD" –  jeremyclarke Oct 21 '13 at 13:32
3  
Preferred solution. Btw, all major browsers today support plain box-shadow without prefix. –  Pointer Null Feb 16 '14 at 12:04
    
One downside is that some browsers fail to print box-shadow correctly and always print it as #000. This COULD be a show stopper if you need to be able to print the page. –  Rob Fox Jul 31 '14 at 7:52
    
@caitriona great suggestion. I made a couple of minor edits to the answer to hopefully improve an already great answer :) I know you answered this forever ago, but some of us still have to code for IE 8 a little longer (hopefully a very short while longer) Thanks! –  mkelley33 Aug 2 '14 at 22:41

Best cross browser solution (mostly for IE support) like @Steve said is to make a div 98px in width and height than add a border 1px around it, or you could make a background image for div 100x100 px and draw a border on it.

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I know this is somewhat older, but since the keywords "border inside" landed me directly here, I would like to share some findings that may be worth mentioning here. When I was adding a border on the hover state, i got the effects that OP is talking about. The border ads pixels to the dimension of the box which made it jumpy. There is two more ways one can deal with this that also work for IE7.

1) Have a border already attached to the element and simply change the color. This way the mathematics are already included.

div {
   width:100px;
   height:100px;
   background-color: #aaa;
   border: 2px solid #aaa; /* notice the solid */
}

div:hover {
   border: 2px dashed #666;
}

2 ) Compensate your border with a negative margin. This will still add the extra pixels, but the positioning of the element will not be jumpy on

div {
   width:100px;
   height:100px;
   background-color: #aaa;
}

div:hover {
  margin: -2px;
  border: 2px dashed #333;
}
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for consistent rendering between new and older browsers, add a double container, the outer with the width, the inner with the border.

<div style="width:100px;">
<div style="border:2px solid #000;">
contents here
</div>
</div>

this is obviously only if your precise width is more important than having extra markup!

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