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I have a program that processes files and returns another file as output. When I am running it in cmd I first set the path: "cd c:\program" and then set it to process the file located in the program folder: "program test.txt". I would like a python program to do it for me using the subprocess module, but I can't get it to work.

I have read the related posts and I know it should be a no-brainer, but as a novice I haven't been able to figure it out. Help greatly appriciated.

Here is one example of the code I tried. It runs, but doesn't produce any results.

import subprocess

textfile = 'c:\program\test.txt'
programPath = r'C:\program\program.exe'
subprocess.Popen([programPath, textfile])
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8  
Please show what you've tried and what went wrong: program + error message. –  larsmans Mar 7 '12 at 12:47
    
Added one example code. –  root Mar 7 '12 at 13:22
    
What do you mean by "It runs, but doesn't produce any results"? How can you tell it's running? How do you expect results to be produced? –  Magnus Hoff Mar 7 '12 at 13:23
    
What I meant is that it does not produce an error. Also it does not produce the desired results. –  root Mar 7 '12 at 13:25
    
Maybe Popen is not what you want. You might want to try subprocess.check_call. –  Magnus Hoff Mar 7 '12 at 13:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You forgot to prepend r to textfile's literal:

textfile = r'c:\program\test.txt'

(\t is a tab character. Next time, please include any error messages in the post as well.)

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Unless I'm mistaken, there wouldn't typically be any error message from this issue. But prepending r is right –  David Robinson Mar 7 '12 at 13:29
    
@DavidRobinson: program.exe would (hopefully) give an error message. –  larsmans Mar 7 '12 at 13:30
    
Thank you. Embarrasingly it solves the problem. (the mistake didn't produce an error though - thats why I thought I was more conceptually wrong here. –  root Mar 7 '12 at 13:32

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