Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        minlist<authorinfo> aif = new minlist<authorinfo>();
        aif.Add(new authorinfo("The Count of Monte Cristo","Alexandre", "Dumas", 1844));
        aif.Add(new authorinfo("Rendezvous with Rama", "Arthur", "Clark", 1972));
        aif.Add(new authorinfo("The Three Musketeers", "Alexandre", "Dumas", 1844));
        aif.Add(new authorinfo("2001: A Space Odyssey", "Arthur", "Clark", 1968));

4 items,

class minlist<T>
{
    T[] storage = new T[3];
    T[] storagereplace = new T[5];
    T[] storagereplace2 = new T[10];
    int spot = 0;

    public void Add(T obj)
    {
        if (spot != 3)
        {
            storage[spot] = obj;
            spot++;
            if (spot == 3)
            {
                int spot2 = spot;

                storage.CopyTo(storagereplace, 0);
                storagereplace[spot2] = obj;
                spot2++;
                foreach (T k in storagereplace)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(k);
                }
                Console.WriteLine(spot2);
            }
        }

Outcome:

Alexandre, Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, 1844

Arthur, Clark, Rendezvous with Rama, 1972

Alexandre, Dumas, The Three Musketeers, 1844

Alexandre, Dumas, The Three Musketeers, 1844

Why does it repeat the last one instead of adding 2001?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

because of this:

   if (spot != 3)
   {
       storage[spot] = obj;
       spot++;
       if (spot == 3)  
       {
   // etc.

think about what this code does if spot is 2. It sets storage[2] = obj, then adds 1 to spot, finds out that spot == 3 and sets storagereplace[3] = obj, too.

Just out of curiosity: Why are you implementing your list class that way instead of using the existing List<T> class?

Still, there are quite a few problems with your class. Like, if spot is larger than 3, storage[spot] = obj will result in an Exception.

Better use List<T> or something similar unless you have a really good reason to implement your own collection classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure about placing spot++ and the end of the method? Nothing shows up when i do that. –  saturn Mar 7 '12 at 13:07
    
No, i revised my answer. Better use List<T> if there is no need to create your own List class. –  Botz3000 Mar 7 '12 at 13:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.