Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have winform application who read files and change, rename etc.
Every time the status change (change, rename, working... etc) the status show in appropriate label, sometimes the next files who need to handle come with delay of number of seconds and when it happens I want timer countdown who display the time until the next file will come.
In the main class I have the property (type double) who receives the time in seconds when the next file will come. I want the timer start if an interval of more than five seconds.
And when its happen the property will get the number of seconds and the timer should read this double and countdown.
How can I check this variable all the time and when he gets a appropriate value the timer will start ?

Here is my class how gets the delaytime:

public class Delay
{   
    public event EventHandler _largeWait;

    public Delay(int numberOfSeconds)
    {
        _numberOfSeconds = numberOfSeconds;
    }

    public double _delayTime;

    public double _packetDelay
    {
        get { return _packetDelay; }

        set
        {
            _packetDelay = value;

            if (value > 5 && _largeWait != null)
            {
                _largeWait(this, EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }
}

And then at the place where i create the Delay instance: (after insert value into the delay variable)

_largeWait += (s, e) =>
    {
        if (_largeWait != null)
         {
             _largeWait(s, e);
         }
     };

the problem here is that this become recursion and i dont know why

share|improve this question
    
Your recursion is at the _packetDelay getter. It should be return _delayTime;. BTW: Starting public Members with underscore is a bad style. "Pascal case" is the commonly used style there. – ChrFin Mar 8 '12 at 8:38

You can implement a setter instead of the short form and start the timer if >5s:

public class Delay
{
    public event EventHandler LargeWait;

    private double numberOfSeconds;
    public double NumberOfSeconds
    {
        get { return numberOfSeconds; }
        set
        {
            numberOfSeconds = value;
            if(value > 5 && LargeWait != null)
                LargeWait(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    public Delay(int numberOfSeconds)
    {
        this.numberOfSeconds = numberOfSeconds;
    }
}

And then at the place where you create the Delay instance:

Delay delay = new Delay(sec);
delay.LargeWait += (s, e) => {
    timer.Tag = s; //s is the Delay instance
    timer.Start();
};
share|improve this answer
    
but from where the class define i cannot reach the timer – user979033 Mar 7 '12 at 13:43
    
Then you can pass in a reference or throw an event you handle where it is reachable... – ChrFin Mar 7 '12 at 13:46
    
can you help me with this ? – user979033 Mar 7 '12 at 13:50
    
If you tell me which way you wanna go, yes... – ChrFin Mar 7 '12 at 13:58
    
maybe with delegate ? – user979033 Mar 7 '12 at 14:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.