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Let's say there are

List<string> a1 = new List<string>();

List<string> a2 = new List<string>();

Is there way to do like this?

if (a1 == a2) 
{

}
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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Kate Gregory, Sliq, Lee Taylor, icktoofay Nov 9 '13 at 3:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What exactly do you expect it to do? return true if both list have the same values and in the same order? –  Baboon Mar 7 '12 at 13:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

If you want to check that the elements inside the list are equal and in the same order, you can use SequenceEqual:

if (a1.SequenceEqual(a2))

See it working online: ideone

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Yup! Cool! tyy!!!! –  Clark Kent Mar 7 '12 at 13:45
    
Don't forget you could also implement your own IEqualityComparer and provide it as second argument (e.g. a IgnoreCase comparer for string). –  Oliver Mar 7 '12 at 13:54
    
@MarkByers, when I am trying the SequenceEqual() in my system, why its throwing an exception like List<string> does not contain a definition for 'SequenceEqual' and no extension method 'SequenceEqual' accepting a first argument of type...... –  Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Mar 7 '12 at 14:08
1  
@SaiKalyanAkshinthala: First that looks more like a compiler error than an exception. Ensure that you are using .NET 3.5 or newer and that you have a using System.Linq directive. Also look at the ideone link I posted to see a fully working example. You should be able to copy and paste it into your IDE and run it. –  Mark Byers Mar 7 '12 at 14:17

I discovered that SequenceEqual is not the most efficient way to compare two lists of strings (initially from http://www.dotnetperls.com/sequenceequal).

I wanted to test this myself so I created two methods:

    /// <summary>
    /// Compares two string lists using LINQ's SequenceEqual.
    /// </summary>
    public bool CompareLists1(List<string> list1, List<string> list2)
    {
        return list1.SequenceEqual(list2);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Compares two string lists using a loop.
    /// </summary>
    public bool CompareLists2(List<string> list1, List<string> list2)
    {
        if (list1.Count != list2.Count)
            return false;

        for (int i = 0; i < list1.Count; i++)
        {
            if (list1[i] != list2[i])
                return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

The second method is a bit of code I encountered and wondered if it could be refactored to be "easier to read." (And also wondered if LINQ optimization would be faster.)

As it turns out, with two lists containing 32k strings, over 100 executions:

  • Method 1 took an average of 6761.8 ticks
  • Method 2 took an average of 3268.4 ticks

I usually prefer LINQ for brevity, performance, and code readability; but in this case I think a loop-based method is preferred.

Edit:

I recompiled using optimized code, and ran the test for 1000 iterations. The results still favor the loop (even more so):

  • Method 1 took an average of 4227.2 ticks
  • Method 2 took an average of 1831.9 ticks

Tested using Visual Studio 2010, C# .NET 4 Client Profile on a Core i7-920

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It's not a fair comparison for two reasons: 1. Equals is not used, 2. It only works for lists, which is OK though for this question. –  mycroes Sep 19 at 11:24

You could also use Except(produces the set difference of two sequences) to check whether there's a difference or not:

IEnumerable<string> difference = a1.Except(a2);
if(!difference.Any()){}
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4  
Two potential problems with using Except : It will only returns items of a1 that do not exist in a2 - so if a2 contained extra items this will return a false negative. Secondly, it does not account for duplication of the same item, only existence. Still a powerful tool, just needs to be used carefully. –  Andrew Hanlon Mar 7 '12 at 23:58

You can check in all the below ways for a List

List<string> FilteredList = new List<string>();
//Comparing the two lists and gettings common elements.
FilteredList = a1.Intersect(a2, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
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Bad on your part @DownVoters. No reason for downvote. Taking revenge??? –  Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Mar 7 '12 at 13:58
1  
I didn't down vote - but your answer doesn't actually address the OP's question. It produces an intersection, so you'll need to do an additional step to check if that intersection matches a1 and a2. –  RichK Mar 7 '12 at 15:45
1  
Also, Intersect will throw out duplicates, so this is only going to check the distinct elements in a1 and a2. –  RichK Mar 7 '12 at 16:23
    private static bool CompareDictionaries(IDictionary<string, IEnumerable<string>> dict1, IDictionary<string, IEnumerable<string>> dict2)
    {
        if (dict1.Count != dict2.Count)
        {
            return false;
        }

        var keyDiff = dict1.Keys.Except(dict2.Keys);
        if (keyDiff.Any())
        {
            return false;
        }

        return (from key in dict1.Keys 
                let value1 = dict1[key] 
                let value2 = dict2[key] 
                select value1.Except(value2)).All(diffInValues => !diffInValues.Any());
    }
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