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I got a piece of code like this:

foo = None

def outer():
    global foo
    foo = 0

    def make_id():
        global foo
        foo += 1
        return foo


    id1 = make_id() # id = 1
    id2 = make_id() # id = 2
    id3 = make_id() # ...

I find it ugly to have foo defined in the outermost scop, I would prefer to have it only in outer function. As I understand correctly, in Python3 this is done by nonlocal. Is there a better method for what I want to have? I would prefer to declare and assign foo in outer and maybe to delcare it global in inner:

def outer():
    foo = 0

    def make_id():
        global foo
        foo += 1     # (A)
        return foo

    id1 = make_id() # id = 1
    id2 = make_id() # id = 2
    id3 = make_id() # ...

(A) does not work, foo seems to be searched in the outermost scope.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Nope, the best alternative for it is function attributes.

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works, thank you! outer.foo = 0 and so on ... –  wal-o-mat Mar 7 '12 at 14:35
    
How would this work in a multi-threaded environment? –  Marcin Mar 7 '12 at 14:42
    
@Marcin Just like a seperate object or a nonlocal variable - you have multiple closures/function objects/hand-rolled objects, and either you keep each to exactly one thread or you'll need synchronization. –  delnan Mar 7 '12 at 14:52
    
@delnan I mean specifically, what happens if another thread enters outer - presumably, this will reset outer.foo. –  Marcin Mar 7 '12 at 14:54
1  
@Marcin No, that's not what happens. The underlying bytecode is shared, but each time a def is executed, a fresh function object is created, each of which is independent from the others. –  delnan Mar 7 '12 at 14:55

I use 1-element lists for this purpose:

def outer():
    foo = [0]
    def make_id():
        r = foo[0]
        foo[0] += 1
        return r
    return make_id

make_id = outer()
id1 = make_id()
id2 = make_id()
...

This is the same as using nonlocal, at the cost of a slightly more cumbersome syntax (foo[0] instead of foo).

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As I solved my original problem with the function attribute, I did not try this. But it looks promising, I'll keep that in mind. –  wal-o-mat Mar 8 '12 at 15:46

No, have this as a parameter to your make_id function. Even better put your id in a class, and have make_id as an instance method, and have that instance as a global (if you must).

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2  
I always use classes for this type of behaviour as well; I think its a much better pattern. –  mikebabcock Mar 7 '12 at 14:39
    
I think this is a classic example of "classes as a poor man's closure." I prefer the closure. –  luispedro Mar 7 '12 at 14:51
    
@luispedro: Not really. In this case it looks like the attempts to keep the data in the function are a poor man's object system. –  Marcin Mar 7 '12 at 14:55
    
Yes, closures are poor man's objects, too. My point is that it's more of a style thing. I feel the closure is a much more direct expression of intent in this case. –  luispedro Mar 7 '12 at 14:58
    
@luispedro My point is not that closures are always a poor man's object system, but rather that there are potential benefits to real objects here, which closures don't provide, such as persisting the value between invocations of the outer function. –  Marcin Mar 8 '12 at 16:02

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