Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm working on a project dealing with a high traffic webpage (really high!). On landing page tons of images are displayed (~40), that needs to be there, right after the page was loaded to display them by fading in. We don't use any library for this since it should be loaded before it was ready to use. We have 4 image servers. Does anybody have any experience which is the best way to load images? I tried the following:

In page header, right after the <head>, inserted a script tag:

<script>
   var img = new Image(); img.src= "src of the image";
</script>

Doing so, images begin and finish to load before DOMReady and Load event. But images on the page with the same url seem to load again, even if they was loaded before. The urls are the same, caching was on, Mozilla was used.

Maybe there's some mechanism that prevents the browser to use those images? or what? Another question: does it cause any slowdown, when DOM and images load parallel?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using a CDN? – Diodeus Mar 7 '12 at 15:30

First, I would recommend using CSS sprites. You can find more information here:

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/sprites

Second, if you want to load the images on DOM ready, use the following:

function listen(event, elem, func) {
  if (elem.addEventListener) {
    elem.addEventListener(event, func, false);
  } else if (elem.attachEvent) {
    elem.attachEvent('on' + event, func);
  }
}

listen('load', window, function() {
  var img = new Image();
  img.src= "src of the image";
});

Using sprites will cut your loading time in half. You eliminate the majority of your HTTP requests and the sprite sheets get cached right away so each subsequent page a user visits will already have it loaded.

EDIT

Here's a way to preload many images:

function preload(images) {
  if (document.images) {
    var imageArray = [];
    imageArray = images.split(',');
    var imageObj = new Image();
    for (var i = 0; i < imageArray.length; i += 1) {
      imageObj.src = imageArray[i];
    }
  }
}

Call the function like this:

preload('image1.jpg,image2.jpg,image3.jpg');
share|improve this answer
    
This answer doesn't do any preloading of images. Sprites is a direction to go, but I don't see how this answer solves the preloading problem. – jfriend00 Mar 7 '12 at 15:53
    
I feel like you would have a better user experience if the images were loaded after DOM ready, especially if your page is heavy in images. When you preload, you're asking the user to wait for the images to load before they can view your site. – Nick Beranek Mar 7 '12 at 16:04
    
Why does preloading the images cause the user to wait longer than your option? The idea of preloading the images is so that they are available sooner and the user has to wait less. The HTML of the page does not wait for images to load before it's available for user interaction. – jfriend00 Mar 7 '12 at 16:06
    
thanks for the quick answer, but: i don't want to load it after or on DOMReady, but before it, that works fine, but I don't know whether it causes any performance issue, slows down DOM loading or anything else. And I don't know why browser wants to load images twice... Use of sprites would be great, but in this case these images are different on each page load, and come from a database. – zak Mar 7 '12 at 16:11
    
I apologize for not answering the question(s) directly. I have had good experience with sprites, but I understand that it won't be possible in this case. The main reason why I like to load JavaScript on DOM ready is so that they are accessible if you want to call each element via document.getElementById(), etc. – Nick Beranek Mar 7 '12 at 16:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.