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I have a class member marked as [DataMember(IsRequired=false)], and I'd like to know if a value for this particular member was specified inside the original message. For example,

[DataContract]
public class Person
{
    [DataMember]
    public String Name { get; set; }

    [DataMember(IsRequired=false)]
    public DateTime BirthDate { get; set; }
}

If I deserialize a the following message using the DataContractSerializer, how can I know that the optional member BirthDate was not specified?

<Person>
    <Name>Carlos</Name>
</Person>

I know for the XmlSerializer there is the Specified pattern for flagging if a member was included inside the message being deserialized. Is there any equivalent for DataContractSerializer?

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1 Answer 1

First of all, you don't need to set IsRequired to false explicitly. By default, it's already false.

Another issue is that EmitDefaultValue is -- by default -- set to true. As a result, a value for DateTime will always be emitted, even if you never set it on serialization time. This value will be default(DateTime.) Similarly, a value for DateTime will always be set on deserialization time, even if it's not even on the wire!

As a result, you can't even tell if something was on the wire or not, at all, out of the box.

But you have several options here. It's extra work but worth it.

  • Check if the date time is deserialized and set to default(DateTime.) If you know for sure that your application will never set the date to default(DateTime), this lets you know that the date wasn't actually present on the wire.

  • Another option you have is to encapsulate the DateTime in a reference type. Since reference types are null if not present, that lets you know right away if a DateTime was present or not (because the encapsulating reference type would be either non-null or null.)

  • Yet another option is to use a nullable date time DataMember (i.e., the type would be "DateTime?" instead of "DateTime".)

  • A final option you have is to add an extra complementary variable (perhaps a boolean) that is set on OnDeserializing/OnDeserialized/OnSerializing/OnSerialized and use this to track whether or not something was actually present on the wire. You might, for example, set this complementary variable to true only when you're actually serializing out a date time.

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