Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So let me start by saying I have a work around for my issue BUT I dont get why the "normal" path is not working.

I have a select control on my site. I am using page objects to interact with the page. If I do (with the first 2 lines under my class and the select by value in my method)

    @FindBy(id="foo")
    private Select foo;
    foo.selectByValue("myValue");

It fails with a null pointer. I also tried without the findBy

Now if I do this in my method it all works fine and selects the correct item

    Select foo = new Select(sDriver.findElement(By.id("foo")));
foo.selectByValue("myValue");

Here is the actual web snippet for that control (edited to protect the innocent)

  <select id="foo" name="service_name">
    <option selected="selected" value="one">one</option>
    <option value="two">two</option>
    <option value="three">three</option>
   </select>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Thats because the Select class has this constructor:

Select(WebElement element)

See the Javadoc

So if you do something like this:

@FindBy(id="foo")
private WebElement wannabeSelect;
Select realSelect = new Select(wannabeSelect);
realSelect.selectByValue("myValue");

It should work.

BTW, I am using the same approach as you in the "workaround" because I dont wanna cast new WebElement object when I need Select object. But anyways, the

sDriver.findElement(By.id("foo"));

returns WebElement, so thats why its working. You can also do this:

 WebElement wannabeSelect = sDriver.findElement(By.id("foo"));
 Select foo = new Select(wannabeSelect);
share|improve this answer
    
ahh that makes sense it just seemed like it should have worked so I never really dug to deep. My fault. Thank you –  ducati1212 Mar 7 '12 at 15:48
    
Note: if you include the Select declaration and cast in your class, just below the private WebElement declaration, you will get runtime errors when the class is instantiated; to avoid this, you can put the Select declaration and class in the method which does the interaction with the screen control. Again not ideal, but it does seem to work. –  vincebowdren Apr 30 '13 at 10:53

There are two ways to select the option value:

One:

// Denotes option value - technical name
select.selectByValue(fieldValue);       

Two:

// Denotes option text that is actually visible to be selected
select.selectByVisibleText(fieldValue);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.