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I have a 5x5 2D array in C#. I need to check the 2 spaces above, below, right and left of the array. What is the best way to do this? The try catch statements are for when it has to check a point that would be out of bounds.

This is what I have so far, and it works, but it just looks sloppy.

bool[,] boardSpaces = new bool[5, 5] { 
    { true, true, true, true, true }, 
    { true, true, true, true, true },
    { true, true, true, true, true },
    { true, true, true, true, true },
    { true, true, true, true, true } 
};


for (int x = 0; x < 5; x++)
{
    for (int y = 0; y < 5; y++)
    {
        if (boardSpaces[x, y] == false)
        {
            try
            {
                if (boardSpaces[x - 1, y] == true && boardSpaces[x - 2, y] == true)
                {
                    validMoveRemaining = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            catch { }

            try
            {
                if (boardSpaces[x + 1, y] == true && boardSpaces[x + 2, y] == true)
                {
                    validMoveRemaining = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            catch { }
            try
            {
                if (boardSpaces[x, y - 1] == true && boardSpaces[x, y - 2] == true)
                {
                    validMoveRemaining = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            catch { }
            try
            {
                if (boardSpaces[x, y + 1] == true && boardSpaces[x, y + 2] == true)
                {
                    validMoveRemaining = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            catch { }

        }
    }
}
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1  
Define "best". Best for what? Getting a passing grade? Minimum amount of code? Most LOC? Efficiency? –  Oded Mar 7 '12 at 16:21
2  
catch { } is so bad. –  vulkanino Mar 7 '12 at 16:21
    
you want to know if a point x,y in your 5x5 matrix is inside the matrix by two positions. right? –  vulkanino Mar 7 '12 at 16:22
    
Passing grade isn't a problem. It works properly. Best as in best practice in general. Readability, efficiency, etc. Also, the catch statement will be modified to only catch out of bounds...soon –  Brandon Mar 7 '12 at 16:23
1  
Hooray for pokemon exception handling! –  Martin Mar 7 '12 at 16:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of exception handling, use arithmetic bounds checking. You already have the row and column index as well as the dimensions of the matrix. Why don't you simply if() that?

if(x - 2 >= 0 && x + 2 < matrixWidth)
{
  //...
}
if(y - 2 >= 0 && y + 2 < matrixHeight)
{
  //...
}

You can even make a compound boolean expression out of it:

validMoveRemaining =
  !board[x,y] && (
    (x >= 2 && board[x - 1, y] && board[x - 2, y]) ||
    (x < boardWidth - 2 && board[x + 1, y] && board[x + 2, y]) ||
    (y >= 2 && board[x, y - 1] && board[x, y - 2]) ||
    (y < boardHeight - 2 && board[x, y + 1] && board[x, y + 2])
  );

There you go! :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Very concise and easy to read code. A big improvement from what I initially constructed –  Brandon Mar 7 '12 at 19:09

that's pretty much it. You will definitely need 2 "fors". You could increase performance by adding some more checks, for example, you don't need to select left on columns 1 and 2 because there aren't 2 left positions so you would check only right. Same logic works for rows, so on row [1,1] you would only check right and bellow. This way you can remove your try catch.

Also you have to check if, since its such a small matrix, maybe the extra check would make it slower than to full loop.

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EDIT as per more clear specs.

public bool CanMove(int x, int y)
{
    if ( checkBeforeX(x, y) )
        return true;

    if ( checkAfterX(x, y) )
        return true;

    if ( checkBeforeY(x, y) )
        return true;

    if ( checkAfterY(x, y) )
        return true;

    return false;
}

private bool checkBeforeX(int x, int y)
{
    return x>=2 ? boardSpaces[x-1, y] && boardSpaces[x-2, y] : false;
}

private bool checkAfterX(int x, int y)
{
    return x<=2 ? boardSpaces[x+1, y] && boardSpaces[x+2, y] : false;
}

private bool checkBeforeY(int x, int y)
{
    return y>=2 ? boardSpaces[x, y-1] && boardSpaces[x, y-2] : false;
}

private bool checkAfterY(int x, int y)
{
    return y<=2 ? boardSpaces[x, y+1] && boardSpaces[x, y+2] : false;
}
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best way for performance than add borders to array

  bool[,] boardSpaces = new bool[9, 9] {  
    { false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false },  
    { false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false },  
    { false, false, true, true, true, true, true, false, false },  
    { false, false, true, true, true, true, true, false, false  }, 
    { false, false, true, true, true, true, true, false, false  }, 
    { false, false, true, true, true, true, true, false, false  }, 
    { false, false, true, true, true, true, true, false, false  },  
    { false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false },  
    { false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false },  
  };

  const int left = 2;
  const int right = left + 5;
  const int top = 2;
  const int bottom = top + 5;

  for (int x = left; x < right; x++)
  {
    for (int y = top; y < bottom; y++)
    {
      ..
    }
  } 

best way for readability than add directions

  var directions = new[] 
  {
     new { dx = -1, dy = 0 }, 
     new { dx = +1, dy = 0 }, 
     new { dx = 0, dy = -1 }, 
     new { dx = 0, dy = +1 } 
  };

  for (int x = left; x < right; x++)
  {
    for (int y = top; y < bottom; y++)
    {
      foreach (var direction in directions)
      {
        if (boardSpaces[x + direction.dx, y + direction.dy] 
           && boardSpaces[x + 2 * direction.dx, y + 2 * direction.dy])
        {
          validMoveRemaining = true;
          break;
        } 

      }
      //..
    }
  } 
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