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I've been having a hard time figuring out why a linear gradient specified for the body element is stopping after the edge of one of its child elements.

So, I have this HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            #container {
                width: 960px;
                height: 700px;
                border: #FFF thick solid;
                margin: auto;
            }
            body {
                background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 71% 92%, from(#1F4BA0), to(#070322));
                background: -moz-linear-gradient(40% 75% 90deg,#1F4BA0, #070322);
                color: #FFF; border:0px; margin:0px; padding:0px;
            }
        </style>
        <title></title>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="container"></div>
    </body>
</html>

And this is what the page ends up looking like (notice repeating gradient going down the page): Screenshot of repeating gradient

So, the problem is, the gradient ends at the bottom of the #container element, instead of carrying on to the end of the body. Despite the gradient being declared explicitly within the body CSS element.

Can anyone else help me out here? Much appreciated!

Note: also happens using -moz prefix in FF.

Reading this made me more confused: "[A linear gradient's] concrete size will match the one of the element it applies to." This is from Mozilla directly

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2 Answers 2

That's because the height of body becomes height of container which is 960px. Checkout the fiddle below, I have made body height and width 100% so now it should not end abruptly as container ends. I hope this helps. http://jsfiddle.net/fNFfW/1/

share|improve this answer
    
here, the problem remains. I understand about the body being limited to it's child element dimensions. I have fixed it by specifying the height of a container explicitly. –  AlexW Mar 7 '12 at 16:51
    
That will show a scrollbar all times on the page and people will scroll to the empty bottom of page. Try specifying gradient on html itself and making its height 100%. For example. html{ height:100%; background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 71% 92%, from(#1F4BA0), to(#070322)); background: -moz-linear-gradient(40% 75% 90deg,#1F4BA0, #070322);} –  websymphony Mar 7 '12 at 16:56
    
Reason being that 100% height is 100% of the child element only, so it is the same problem! :) –  AlexW Mar 7 '12 at 16:59
    
I agree, but when you set the background for html like over here: jsfiddle.net/fNFfW/3 although container is only 100px high. the whole html document gets the gradient. –  websymphony Mar 7 '12 at 17:05
    
Problem is that the html element is defined as the visible window area of the document, not the whole document. I tried the html idea, but it repeats after the size of the window. –  AlexW Mar 7 '12 at 17:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have fixed the issue using this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            #main {

               background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 71% 92%, from(#1F4BA0), to(#070322));
               background: -moz-linear-gradient(40% 75% 90deg,#1F4BA0, #070322);
               height:2300px;

            }

            #container {
                width: 960px;
                height: 700px;
                border: #FFF thick solid;
                margin: auto;
            }
            body { 
                color: #FFF; border:0px; margin:0px; padding:0px;
            }
        </style>
        <title></title>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="main">
            <div id="container"></div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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