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I have a little Problem!


class AKSH
{
private:
 typedef map<string,void (AKSH::*)()> t_list;
public:
 t_list list;
 AKSH(){...}

};

AKSH sh;

void AKSH::doWork()
{
 map<string,void (AKSH::*)()>::iterator it;
 ...
 if(it != list.end())
 {
 (sh.*it->second)();
}

int main()
{
 AKSH aksh;
 aksh.doWork();
}

I have to generate 2 Objects(aksh,sh). How could i use aksh with the iterator, or is there a mistake in the line(sh.*it->second)?

share|improve this question
1  
Not sure about this issue, but make sure to check out std::function sometime soon. :-) Gets useful very often –  Kos Mar 7 '12 at 17:54
1  
void (AKSH::*)() doesn't declare a pointer to function. It declares a pointer to member function. Those are vastly different things‌​. –  Robᵩ Mar 7 '12 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

You want: (this->*(it->second))();

But, before you add it, please read this page! If you don't read that page, and if you do continue to use pointer-to-member-function, I guarantee you will tear your hair out.

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class AKSH
{
private:
 typedef std::map<std::string,void (AKSH::*)()> t_list;
 const std::string name;
public:
 t_list list;
 void add() { std::cout << name << ": " << __FUNCTION__ << "\n"; }
 void sub() { std::cout << name << ": " << __FUNCTION__ << "\n"; }
 void doWork(const std::string&);
 AKSH(const std::string& name) :name(name) {
  list["add"] = &AKSH::add;
  list["sub"] = &AKSH::sub;
 }
};

AKSH sh("sh");

void AKSH::doWork(const std::string& str)
{
 AKSH::t_list::iterator it;
 it = list.find(str);
 if(it != list.end())
 {
  (this->*(it->second))();
 }
 else
 {
  std::cout << name << ": No such command: " << str << "\n";
 }
}
int main()
{
 AKSH aksh("aksh");
 aksh.doWork("add"); aksh.doWork("sub");
 sh.doWork("add"); sh.doWork("sub");
 sh.doWork("div"); aksh.doWork("mul");
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! i'll read the paper –  Andrew Vale Mar 7 '12 at 18:14

I think this should be

#include <iostream>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

class AKSH
{
private:
    typedef map<string,void (AKSH::*)()> t_list;
public:
    t_list list;
    AKSH(){}
    void doWork();
};

AKSH sh;

void AKSH::doWork()
{
    map<string,void (AKSH::*)()>::iterator it;
    if(it != list.end())
    {
        // here it comes.
        (this->*(it->second))();
    }
}

int main()
{
    AKSH aksh;
    aksh.doWork();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Regarding official doc it's neither (*it).second not it->second to access values of a std::map through iterator: cplusplus.com/reference/stl/map –  Patrice Bernassola Mar 7 '12 at 17:51
    
Doesn't work! error: base operand of '->' has non-pointer type 'std::pair<const std::basic_string<char, void (AKSH::*)()>' –  Andrew Vale Mar 7 '12 at 17:52
    
As I said above, use (*it).second since (*it) give you access to the element value (std::pair<...>) of the map –  Patrice Bernassola Mar 7 '12 at 17:55
    
1) *it gives you a pair, not a pair*, so (*it)->second won't compile under any circumstance. 2) (*it).second and it->second are identical, you may use them interchangably, and 3) second isn't a function pointer, it is a member-function pointer, which requires a whole other syntax for the call. –  Robᵩ Mar 7 '12 at 18:16
    
Rob is right, and I repaired it. It's easier, when you give a compilable unit in a question, or at least compilable up to one problematic thing, that is the core of the question. –  Jörg Beyer Mar 7 '12 at 18:38

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