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So I have a bunch of tables using SQLAlchemy that are modelled as objects which inherit from the result to a call to declarative_base(). Ie:

Base = declarative_base()
class Table1(Base):
    # __tablename__ & such here

class Table2(Base):
     # __tablename__ & such here

Etc. I then wanted to have some common functionality available to each of my DB table classes, the easiest way to do this according to the docs is to just do multiple inheritance:

Base = declarative_base()

class CommonRoutines(object):
    @classmethod
    def somecommonaction(cls):
        # body here

class Table1(CommonRoutines, Base):
    # __tablename__ & such here

class Table2(CommonRoutines, Base):
     # __tablename__ & such here

The thing I don't like about this is A) multiple inheritance in general is a bit icky (gets tricky resolving things like super() calls, etc), B) if I add a new table I have to remember to inherit from both Base and CommonRoutines, and C) really that "CommonRoutines" class "is-a" type of table in a sense. Really what CommonBase is is an abstract base class which defines a set of fields & routines which are common to all tables. Put another way: "its-a" abstract table.

So, what I'd like is this:

Base = declarative_base()

class AbstractTable(Base):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta  # make into abstract base class

    # define common attributes for all tables here, like maybe:
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    @classmethod
    def somecommonaction(cls):
        # body here

class Table1(AbstractTable):
    # __tablename__ & Table1 specific fields here

class Table2(AbstractTable):
     # __tablename__ & Table2 specific fields here

But this of course doesn't work, as I then have to A) define a __tablename__ for AbstractTable, B) the ABC aspect of things causes all sorts of headaches, and C) have to indicate some sort of DB relationship between AbstractTable and each individual table.

So my question: is it possible to achieve this in a reasonable way? Ideally I'd like to enforce:

  • No multiple inheritance
  • CommonBase/AbstractTable be abstract (ie cannot be instantiated)
share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

It is pretty straigh-forward, you just make declarative_base() to return a Base class which inherits from your CommonBase using cls= parameter. Also shown in Augmenting The Base docs. Your code might then look similar to below:

class CommonBase(object):
    @classmethod
    def somecommonaction(cls):
        # body here

Base = declarative_base(cls=CommonBase)

class Table1(Base):
    # __tablename__ & Table1 specific fields here

class Table2(Base):
     # __tablename__ & Table2 specific fields here
share|improve this answer
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but those "AbstractTable" inheritances should read "Base", correct? (ie class Table1(Base):) – Adam Parkin Mar 8 '12 at 16:16
    
@AdamParkin: of course. corrected. – van Mar 8 '12 at 16:17
    
Yup, this was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! The only drawback to the approach is that now the CommonBase class's __init__ does not get called (declarative_base produces a class which doesn't call super in its __init__ so Python's cooperative multiple inheritance mechanisms don't work). Hmm.... – Adam Parkin Mar 8 '12 at 16:22

SQLAlchemy version 0.7.3 introduced the __abstract__ directive which is used for abstract classes that should not be mapped to a database table, even though they are subclasses of sqlalchemy.ext.declarative.api.Base. So now you create a base class like this:

Base = declarative_base()

class CommonRoutines(Base):
    __abstract__ = True

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    def __init__(self):
        # ...

Notice how CommonRoutines doesn't have a __tablename__ attribute. Then create subclasses like this:

class Foo(CommonRoutines):
    __tablename__ = 'foo'

    name = Column(...)

    def __init__(self, name):
        super().__init__()
        self.name = name
        # ...

This will map to the table foo and inherit the id attribute from CommonRoutines.

Source and more information: http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_0_7/orm/extensions/declarative.html#abstract

share|improve this answer

You can use AbstractConcreteBase to make an absract base model:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import AbstractConcreteBase


class AbstractTable(AbstractConcreteBase, Base):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)

    @classmethod
    def somecommonaction(cls):
        # body here
share|improve this answer

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