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I read a piece of Javascript code, where the programmer added something similar to this:

html = " 
        <div class='hidden-context-menu'>
          <ul><li><a class='select-all'>All</a></li>
              <li><a class='select-none'>None</a></li>
               ...
               ...
               ...
          </ul>
        </div>
 "

and then, in some other parts of the webapp, this piece of code is used and rendered in the page.

output_html(html);

I assume, considering this specific example of a hidden context menu, that maybe the developer did't want to repeat himself..

Is this kind of practice encouraged or it has to be considered a wrong approach?

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1  
your example is not MUCH different than instantiating and appending / prepending elements via js objects. I guess the determining factor is the volume of html that the string contains and whether that structure can be easier defined via js objects and some loop process or not? /2cents edit: my main concern would be SEO implications –  Brandt Solovij Mar 7 '12 at 17:54
    
It's always acceptable, but not always the BEST way. –  Diodeus Mar 7 '12 at 17:56
    
I'd say it's better to keep the HTML separate from the javascript as much as you can (sometimes it's hard to stick to this rule). –  m1. Mar 7 '12 at 18:00
    
I haven't done tests in years, but also last time I tried it was about 10x faster to build a DOM through the HTML parser than to call document.createElement a bunch of times. Something to keep in mind if you're creating thousands of nodes perhaps. –  Mike Christensen Mar 7 '12 at 21:53
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say that relying on Javascript to generate your HTML is probably a bad idea. What if the user has Javascript turned off in their browser?

I think that it is more common to find HTML generated by a server-side script, like PHP. The resulting page that the client receives is the same as it would be if PHP wasn't used, and the developer just typed out the HTML repeatedly.

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For dynamic webapps, outputting html is fine. To put it all in a string however seems very counterintuitive when functions exist for element creation. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Mar 7 '12 at 17:59
    
Newer-generation frameworks, such as EXT.JS render all of the UI client-side using JavaScript. –  Diodeus Mar 7 '12 at 18:03
1  
@JeffreySweeney: I think using element creation when necessary is fine, but I don't think it's a good idea to use it when the exact same functionality can be achieved by simply typing out the HTML. Again, I ask...what if the user has Javascript turned off in their browser? Then the element will not be generated, whereas if they just typed it out, it would have been. And the functionality to the client would be exactly the same. –  Travesty3 Mar 7 '12 at 18:04
    
@Travesty3 agreed. It's right up there with Flash-only websites. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Mar 7 '12 at 18:07
    
Best practices dictate that your website should work no matter what, and javascript can be used to sweeten the experience. There is never a reason, aside from laziness, budgets, or your damndable marketing department not understanding and giving you time to do otherwise. –  Chris Sobolewski Mar 7 '12 at 18:14
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Outputting HTML in this fashion can lead to a lot of headaches in the future, for the same reason CSS should be external: harder to find, mixes with unrelated code, and often results in needless repetition.

If the framework you're told to use requires it, or if a former developer riddled the code with it, there really isn't too much that can be done.


Edit: the following code will perform the same function, and is easier to manipulate in the future:

var div = document.createElement("div");
div.className = "hidden-context-menu";

var ul = document.createElement("ul");

var li = document.createElement("li");
var a = document.createElement("a");
a.className = "select-all";
li.appendChild(a);
ul.appendChild(li);

var li = document.createElement("li");
var a = document.createElement("a");
a.className = "select-none";
li.appendChild(a);
ul.appendChild(li);

div.appendChild(ul);

And by the way, as the above poster said, Javascript should not be the only mechanism for outputting HTML; the HTML page should be responsible for that! It's fine in 'webappy' applications, however.

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another benfit of this method is that the created elements will be accessible if you need to traverse the DOM, and they won't be in the OP's code. –  Evert Mar 7 '12 at 18:10
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What absolutely horrible code ... they should've used a better variable name than 'html'.

As for being the wrong approach -- there are issues in some browsers w/ direct modification if it's an XHTML page. If it's not being dynamically generated, you're often better off inserting it in with the rest of the HTML, and using CSS to hide/show it when needed.

For drilldown menu type functionality, I typically leave it showing with the initial CSS, but then have JavaScript hide it on page load -- this way, if JS is off, they just have fully expanded menus, rather than no access to the lower level stuff. If you make it so the manu section related to the current page is expanded, you don't have to do this, it just means more clicks as they go to each page to get to the content they're looking for.

In your case, as there's no 'href' for the anchors, I'm guessing that those elements are only functional when JavaScript is turned on, so I really see no problem with it being inserted via JS. (and as for inserting HTML vs. doing it by element ... if it's HTML, and not XHTML, I have no problem with inserting a string, as I find it easier to maintain ... and if it's going to be actually in the HTML file, I say there's even more reason to keep it as a string of HTML)

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