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a.php

<?php

echo "AAA\n";
if(class_exists('NotImplementedException')) {
    echo "BBB\n";
    return;
    echo "DDD\n";
}

echo "CCC\n";

/**
 * Thrown when a feature is not yet implemented.
 */
class NotImplementedException extends Exception {}

b.php

<?php
include 'a.php';
include 'a.php';

When I run b.php I get:

AAA
BBB
PHP Fatal error:  Cannot redeclare class NotImplementedException in /home/mark/Tests/IncludeTwice/a.php on line 15

What's going on here? The output I would expect is

AAA
CCC
(class gets declared for first time)
AAA
BBB
(execution stops)

To those saying "the interpreter scans and parses the whole file first": then why does this work?:

<?php

class A{}

if(!class_exists('A')) {
    class A{}
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

I think one part is a bug...

The PHP interpreter works differently if you are extending a class.

This works:

<?php

class a {}
exit();
class a extends Exception {}

?>

This does not:

<?php

class a extends Exception {}
exit();
class a {}

?>

From what I can see in the PHP 5.4.0 source, there are two different functions that handle the binding of classes: do_bind_class:4494 for standalone classes and do_bind_inherited_class:4533 for inherited classes (ones that use the extend keyword).

The stand-alone function has a conditional that ignores duplicate class definitions at compile time in case it is never hit at runtime. The inherited class version is missing this conditional (maybe on purpose, maybe not).

I would patch the inherited function to have the same conditional, test and submit to the developers.

And the other part is a feature...

As for your conditional class piece: I believe that PHP will load your class at compile-time if it is declared at global scope, but if it is contained inside a block, it will not be loaded until it is executed.

This works:

<?php

$a = new A();

//{
    class A {}
//}

?>

This doesn't work, even though it is logically identical:

<?php

$a = new A();

{
    class A {}
}

?>

When you combine these two pieces of functionality, your problem arises since your class is both an inherited class and declared at global scope.

share|improve this answer
    
You still haven't addressed the issue: Why does if(!class_exists(...)) work then? I can understand it if it works the way you describe, or if it runs line-by-line, but I don't see how it can be both. –  Mark Mar 12 '12 at 15:37
    
I have updated my answer. –  Martin Mar 13 '12 at 0:22
    
Thank you. That's a much better answer. I still find it quite strange, but at least I can work with this now. –  Mark Mar 13 '12 at 1:58

You need to move the class declaration into an else statement from the class_exists() call. You are declaring it both times that you include a.php. The return doesn't prevent the file from being parsed, which includes the class declaration in this case. So while the script execution doesn't make it past your return, PHP sees that you've declared NotImplementedException more than once.

Think of it as if you put a bunch of syntactically incorrect code after a return. The parser will still give you an error even though the code execution won't make it there.

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1  
Yes - furthermore I'd move the class definition into its own file anyway - and then just use require_once() whenever it is required. Or better yet, set up an autoloader, and you'll not have to worry about this stuff again. –  halfer Mar 7 '12 at 18:00
    
@halfer Excellent points as well. –  jprofitt Mar 7 '12 at 18:02
    
Time out. That still doesn't explain it. Why isn't "AAA" being printed twice at least? If it parses it first, and then executes it second, then I would expect "AAA\nCCC" because the first run would succeed, and then the second would would fail immediately. But that's not what it prints, it gives me "AAA\nBBB" which suggest that this is the 2nd run.... so where's my other AAA? –  Mark Mar 7 '12 at 18:03
    
And also, what's difference putting the declaration in an else block? How is that fundamentally different than returning? Both execution paths suggest that the class shouldn't be redeclared, but if you're saying it "parses the whole file anyway"...then...regardless if it's in the else, it should see that the class is still there, whether it's in an "else" or after a "return". –  Mark Mar 7 '12 at 18:05
    
@halfer: The class definition is in it's own file, aside from those couple of lines above. What if I can't control how my file gets included? Telling me to put require_once everywhere else isn't a viable solution. If I put a check inside the file, then it doesn't matter how it gets included. Yes, I could wrap the whole thing in a class_exists (which is what I've done), but I still want to know what's going on. –  Mark Mar 7 '12 at 18:15

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