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I have code

public static class PredicateExtensions
    {

        public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> True<T>() { return f => true; }
        public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> False<T>() { return f => false; }

        public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Or<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expression1, Expression<Func<T, bool>> expression2)
        {
            var invokedExpression = Expression.Invoke(expression2, expression1.Parameters.Cast<Expression>());
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(Expression.Or(expression1.Body, invokedExpression), expression1.Parameters);
        }
        public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> And<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expression1, Expression<Func<T, bool>> expression2)
        {
            var invokedExpression = Expression.Invoke(expression2, expression1.Parameters.Cast<Expression>());
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(Expression.And(expression1.Body, invokedExpression), expression1.Parameters);
        }
    }

How to use this code instead of LINQ Union and Intersect methods ?

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1  
This is the well known predicate builder -- it exists to facilitate composition of .Where clauses. It has nothing to do with either Union or Intersect -- use those methods as you normally would. –  Kirk Woll Mar 7 '12 at 18:14
1  
I was given a hint: "Use something like var predicate = PredicateExtensions.False <Customer> (); predicate = predicate.Or (p => p.CustomerID.Contains ("N")) Correspondingly, "Union" replaced by "Or" and the "Intersect" at the "And"." –  Viktor Mar 7 '12 at 18:22
1  
that hint makes no sense to me. Union and Intersect are set operations that operate on a sequence. PredicateBuilder's And and Or are boolean operations that operate on predicates. They really have nothing to do with one another. –  Kirk Woll Mar 7 '12 at 18:26

1 Answer 1

If you have a union and intersection of the form:

var union = source.Where(predicate0).Union(source.Where(predicate1));
var inter = source.Where(predicate0).Intersect(source.Where(predicate1));

Then union will have the values for which either predicate0 or predicate1 was true while inter will have the values for which both predicate0 and predicate1 were true.

For this reason, the following would have the same result:

var union = source.Where(predicate0.Or(predicate1));
var inter = source.Where(predicate0.And(predicate1));

This depends upon the components of the union and intersection being produced by two Where queries though. In the likes of:

var union = source1.Where(predicate0).Select(item => item.ID)
  .Union(source2.Where(predicate1).Select(item => item.ID));

Then it's likely that the predicates aren't even of the same type, and there are yet other cases where combining predicates will not work as a replacement of Union and Intersect.

It is though useful to be able to consider the first examples both ways, in terms of one's understanding of how predicates, unions and intersections work.

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