Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As a trivia question, I'm trying to write a javascript function that returns its variable number of arguments in sorted (normal lexicographic) order.

Having never dealt with javascript before, I came across the "arguments" object, which seems to work somewhat like an array but without having the standard array functions -- therefore I seem to need to copy its contents into a "real" array.

Is there a shorter/more concise way of doing this (preferably in a single line)?

function sortArgs() 
{
    args = new Array(); 
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) 
        args[i] = arguments[i]; 
    return args.sort();
}

UPDATE:
Brownie points for explaining how your answer works, since I'm new to JS. I understand slice(), but not the rest of it..

share|improve this question
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 158 down vote accepted

Use:

function sortArgs() 
{
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0);
    return args.sort();
}

for brownie points:

Array.prototype.slice is the slice method belonging to all instances of Array as this is coming from the prototype (or cookie cutter) of Arrays.

.call and .apply can be used to apply a function from another object as if it were a part of the object being called upon.

OtherObj.prototype.someFuntion.call(yourobject,arg1) would use yourobject as this in someFunction. You're essentially changing the context of the function.

see: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Global_Objects/Function/apply and https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Global_Objects/Function/call

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, thanks for the explanation. –  Andrew Coleson Jun 7 '09 at 0:42
2  
In recent Firefox versions (2.0?) and ECMAScript 5, there's an Array.slice method that make this a little simpler. You would call it like this: var arge = Array.slice(arguments, 0);. –  Matthew Crumley Jun 7 '09 at 2:06
    
converting array-like objects to arrays via slice() unfortunately deson't work reliably across browsers - eg IE can't convert node lists this way; for a general function which works with all array-like objects, there's no way around manually looping over the entries –  Christoph Jun 7 '09 at 15:13
6  
What's the 0 for? Since there are no arguments you want to pass, why can't you just use var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); ? [ The MDC arguments page ](developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/…) suggests the method without the 0. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 5 '10 at 17:56
    
@Christoph - IE should be able to convert arguments. This is because arguments has a properly set length property. As long as this is the case, the above method should work. (This works in IE 8: jsfiddle.net/6fyUT ) –  Peter Ajtai Oct 5 '10 at 18:02
show 5 more comments

To golf:

function sortArgs(){ return [].slice.call(arguments).sort() }

// Returns the arguments object itself
function sortArgs(){ return [].sort.call(arguments) }

Some array methods are intentionary made not to require the target object to be an actual array. They only require the target to have a property named length and indices (which must be zero or larger integers).

[].sort.call({0:1, 1:0, length:2}) // => ({0:0, 1:1, length:2})
share|improve this answer
1  
Those are fun. You want to explain how they work? –  Nosredna Jun 9 '09 at 18:36
add comment

Use:

function sortArguments() {
  return arguments.length === 1 ? [arguments[0]] :
                 Array.apply(null, arguments).sort();
}

Array(arg1, arg2, ...) returns [arg1, arg2, ...]

Array(str1) returns [str1]

Array(num1) returns an array that has num1 elements

You must check number of arguments!

Array.slice version (slower):

function sortArguments() {
  return Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments).sort();
}

Array.push version (slower, faster than slice):

function sortArguments() {
  var args = [];
  Array.prototype.push.apply(args, arguments);
  return args.sort();
}

Move version (slower, but small size is faster):

function sortArguments() {
  var args = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
    args[i] = arguments[i];
  return args.sort();
}

Array.concat version (slowest):

function sortArguments() {
  return Array.prototype.concat.apply([], arguments).sort();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to SO :) –  Spooky Oct 27 '13 at 15:01
    
Thanks a lot! :) –  LightSpeedC Kazuaki Nishizawa Oct 27 '13 at 15:37
add comment

If you're using jQuery, the following is a good deal easier to remember in my opinion:

function sortArgs(){
  return $.makeArray(arguments).sort();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's essentially what I was looking for in pure JS, but +1 for the solid example of how jQuery makes JS a bit easier to grok. –  Andrew Coleson Jun 7 '09 at 0:21
add comment

This is a very old question, but I think I have a solution that is slightly easier to type than previous solutions and doesn't rely on external libraries:

function sortArguments() {
  return Array.apply(null, arguments).sort();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is benchmark of several methods converting arguments into array.

As for me, the best solution for small amount of arguments is:

function sortArgs (){
  var q = [];
  for (var k = 0, l = arguments.length; k < l; k++){
    q[k] = arguments[k];
  }
  return q.sort();
}

For other cases:

function sortArgs (){ return Array.apply(null, arguments).sort(); }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for benchmarks. Currently the graphs show your sortArgs is 6 times faster in Firefox, but twice as slow in the latest Chrome, compared to Array.apply. –  joeytwiddle Jul 18 '13 at 20:03
add comment

A little something simple for you :)

function sortArgs() { return [].slice.call(arguments, 0).sort(); }
share|improve this answer
add comment

It's also worth referencing this Bluebird promises library wiki page that shows how to manage the arguments object into array in a way that makes the function optimizable under V8 JavaScript engine:

function doesntLeakArguments() {
    var args = new Array(arguments.length);
    for(var i = 0; i < args.length; ++i) {
        args[i] = arguments[i];
    }
    return args;
}

This method is used in favor of var args = [].slice.call(arguments);. The author also shows how a build step can help reduce the verbosity.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Another Answer.

Use Black Magic Spells:

function sortArguments() {
  arguments.__proto__ = Array.prototype;
  return arguments.slice().sort();
}

Firefox, Chrome, Node.js, IE11 are OK.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Can you not just call arguments.sort()? (Or was the whole purpose to clone the elements)

share|improve this answer
5  
No, this is not possible, because arguments is not an array and only arrays have this method. –  Felix Kling Feb 22 '11 at 16:21
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.