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The arguments object in JavaScript is an odd wart—it acts just like an array in most situations, but it's not actually an array object. Since it's really something else entirely, it doesn't have the useful functions from Array.prototype like forEach, sort, filter, and map.

It's trivially easy to construct a new array from an arguments object with a simple for loop. For example, this function sorts its arguments:

function sortArgs() {
    var args = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++)
        args[i] = arguments[i];
    return args.sort();
}

However, this is a rather pitiful thing to have to do simply to get access to the extremely useful JavaScript array functions. Is there a built-in way to do it using the standard library?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 188 down vote accepted

You can actually just use Array's slice function on an arguments object, and it will convert it into a standard JavaScript array. You'll just have to reference it manually through Array's prototype:

function sortArgs() {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
    return args.sort();
}

Why does this work? Well, here's an excerpt from the ECMAScript 5 documentation itself:

NOTE: The slice function is intentionally generic; it does not require that its this value be an Array object. Therefore it can be transferred to other kinds of objects for use as a method. Whether the slice function can be applied successfully to a host object is implementation-dependent.

Therefore, slice works on anything that has a length property, which arguments conveniently does.


If Array.prototype.slice is too much of a mouthful for you, you can abbreviate it slightly by using array literals:

var args = [].slice.call(arguments);

However, I tend to feel that the former version is more explicit, so I'd prefer it instead. Abusing the array literal notation feels hacky and looks strange.


Furthermore, in the upcoming ES6 Harmony proposal, you can use Array.from to efficiently convert Array-like objects to Array instances. Unfortunately, Array.from is currently only implemented in newer versions of Firefox, and it is relatively unusable due to its lack of browser support.

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2  
In recent Firefox versions (2.0?) and ECMAScript 5, there's an Array.slice method that make this a little simpler. You would call it like this: var arge = Array.slice(arguments, 0);. –  Matthew Crumley Jun 7 '09 at 2:06
1  
converting array-like objects to arrays via slice() unfortunately deson't work reliably across browsers - eg IE can't convert node lists this way; for a general function which works with all array-like objects, there's no way around manually looping over the entries –  Christoph Jun 7 '09 at 15:13
9  
What's the 0 for? Since there are no arguments you want to pass, why can't you just use var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); ? [ The MDC arguments page ](developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/…) suggests the method without the 0. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 5 '10 at 17:56
    
@Christoph - IE should be able to convert arguments. This is because arguments has a properly set length property. As long as this is the case, the above method should work. (This works in IE 8: jsfiddle.net/6fyUT ) –  Peter Ajtai Oct 5 '10 at 18:02
    
Why is the sort necessary? It's the one part that isn't self-explanatory (provided one understands the methods). In what circumstances would the one liner return Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0); not produce the same results? –  Barney May 22 '13 at 17:12
function sortArgs(){ return [].slice.call(arguments).sort() }

// Returns the arguments object itself
function sortArgs(){ return [].sort.call(arguments) }

Some array methods are intentionally made not to require the target object to be an actual array. They only require the target to have a property named length and indices (which must be zero or larger integers).

[].sort.call({0:1, 1:0, length:2}) // => ({0:0, 1:1, length:2})
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Use:

function sortArguments() {
  return arguments.length === 1 ? [arguments[0]] :
                 Array.apply(null, arguments).sort();
}

Array(arg1, arg2, ...) returns [arg1, arg2, ...]

Array(str1) returns [str1]

Array(num1) returns an array that has num1 elements

You must check number of arguments!

Array.slice version (slower):

function sortArguments() {
  return Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments).sort();
}

Array.push version (slower, faster than slice):

function sortArguments() {
  var args = [];
  Array.prototype.push.apply(args, arguments);
  return args.sort();
}

Move version (slower, but small size is faster):

function sortArguments() {
  var args = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
    args[i] = arguments[i];
  return args.sort();
}

Array.concat version (slowest):

function sortArguments() {
  return Array.prototype.concat.apply([], arguments).sort();
}
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If you're using jQuery, the following is a good deal easier to remember in my opinion:

function sortArgs(){
  return $.makeArray(arguments).sort();
}
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That's essentially what I was looking for in pure JS, but +1 for the solid example of how jQuery makes JS a bit easier to grok. –  Andrew Coleson Jun 7 '09 at 0:21

Here is benchmark of several methods converting arguments into array.

As for me, the best solution for small amount of arguments is:

function sortArgs (){
  var q = [];
  for (var k = 0, l = arguments.length; k < l; k++){
    q[k] = arguments[k];
  }
  return q.sort();
}

For other cases:

function sortArgs (){ return Array.apply(null, arguments).sort(); }
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+1 for benchmarks. Currently the graphs show your sortArgs is 6 times faster in Firefox, but twice as slow in the latest Chrome, compared to Array.apply. –  joeytwiddle Jul 18 '13 at 20:03

It's also worth referencing this Bluebird promises library wiki page that shows how to manage the arguments object into array in a way that makes the function optimizable under V8 JavaScript engine:

function doesntLeakArguments() {
    var args = new Array(arguments.length);
    for(var i = 0; i < args.length; ++i) {
        args[i] = arguments[i];
    }
    return args;
}

This method is used in favor of var args = [].slice.call(arguments);. The author also shows how a build step can help reduce the verbosity.

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This is a very old question, but I think I have a solution that is slightly easier to type than previous solutions and doesn't rely on external libraries:

function sortArguments() {
  return Array.apply(null, arguments).sort();
}
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Array.apply won't work if you have only a single positive integer argument. It is because new Array(3) creates an array length of 3. To be more specific the result will be [undefined, undefined, undefined] and not [3]. –  inf3rno Aug 13 at 1:01
//var args must be create before and contain an Arguments Object
var i = 0;
var loop = 1000000;
var t = Date.now();
while(i < loop)
{
    Array.prototype.slice.call(args, 0); 
    i++;
}
console.log(Date.now() - t);

i = 0,
t = Date.now();
while(i < loop)
{
    Array.apply(null, args);
    i++;
}
console.log(Date.now() - t);

RESULT?

Array.prototype.slice.call(args, 0); => 1172ms

Array.apply(null, args); => 868ms

Enjoy !

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Another Answer.

Use Black Magic Spells:

function sortArguments() {
  arguments.__proto__ = Array.prototype;
  return arguments.slice().sort();
}

Firefox, Chrome, Node.js, IE11 are OK.

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