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From a bash script how can I quickly find out whether a port 445 is open/listening on a server.

I have tried a couple of options, but I want something quick:
1. lsof -i :445 (Takes seconds)
2. netstat -an |grep 445 |grep LISTEN (Takes seconds)
3. telnet (it doesn't return)
4. nmap, netcat are not available on the server

It will be nice to know of a way that doesn't enumerate first and greps after that.

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Is netcat available? It has a fast fail path IIRC. netcat.sourceforge.net –  JimR Mar 7 '12 at 21:19
4  
netstat -lnt (with -t and without -a) will limit output to listening TCP connections only. It may speed-up a little bit. You can add -4 for IPv4 only if you don't need IPv6. –  Bartosz Moczulski Mar 7 '12 at 21:20
    
lsof -i is a personal favorite. –  Matt Joyce Mar 8 '12 at 5:40
8  
netstat -an | grep PORTNUMBER | grep -i listen If the output is empty, the port is not in use. –  automatix Sep 28 '13 at 13:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 66 down vote accepted

A surprise I found out recently is that Bash natively supports tcp connections as file descriptors. To use:

exec 6<>/dev/tcp/ip.addr.of.server/445
echo -e "GET / HTTP/1.0\n" >&6
cat <&6

I'm using 6 as the file descriptor because 0,1,2 are stdin, stdout, and stderr. 5 is sometimes used by Bash for child processes, so 3,4,6,7,8, and 9 should be safe.

As per the comment below, to test for listening on a local server in a script:

exec 6<>/dev/tcp/127.0.0.1/445 || echo "No one is listening!"
exec 6>&- # close output connection
exec 6<&- # close input connection

To determine if someone is listening, attempt to connect by loopback. If it fails, then the port is closed or we aren't allowed access. Afterwards, close the connection.

Modify this for your use case, such as sending an email, exiting the script on failure, or starting the required service.

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1  
This just hanged for me. –  Aman Jain Mar 7 '12 at 21:27
    
@AmanJain cat waits for EOF or Ctrl-C to quit. You'll need to adjust this for your protocol. BTW are you running this to a remote server? –  Spencer Rathbun Mar 7 '12 at 21:57
    
I want to embed the port checking code in a script on the server, under /etc/init.d/ –  Aman Jain Mar 7 '12 at 22:14
    
@AmanJain I've updated it for a local system. You do just want to check if it's listening correct? There isn't any protocol checking, such as requesting a page via http? –  Spencer Rathbun Mar 8 '12 at 13:28
    
if a port is taken, it returns nothing, is there any way to make it say "port is taken by <process id>" or smth –  Nik Aug 16 '13 at 17:24

You can use netstat this way for much faster results:

On Linux:

netstat -lnt | awk '$6 == "LISTEN" && $4 ~ ".445"'

On Mac:

netstat -anp tcp | awk '$6 == "LISTEN" && $4 ~ "\.445"'
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1  
your netstat syntax is incorrect. netstat -ln --tcp works, but still slow –  Aman Jain Mar 7 '12 at 21:43
4  
Actually it is correct syntax but probably you're using Linux and I am on Mac. For Linux use this: netstat -lnt | awk '$6 == "LISTEN" && $4 ~ ".445"' –  anubhava Mar 7 '12 at 21:45
8  
this outputted nothing. –  Mich Feb 22 '13 at 0:45
1  
The question was about linux though, so perhaps the comment should be in the answer. –  UpTheCreek Sep 23 '13 at 10:04
1  
In order to check for port 80 I needed to use awk '$6 == "LISTEN" && $4 ~ "80$"'. Instead of checking for the dot before the port number with \.80, I used 80$. Otherwise, this also matched IP addresses containing .80 and ports starting with 80 such as 8000. –  Patrick Oscity Jul 2 '14 at 22:41

There's a very short with "fast answer" here : How to test if remote TCP port is opened from Shell script?

$ nc -z <host> <port>; echo $?

I use it with 127.0.0.1 as "remote" address.

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1  
That seems to be the easiest way, thanks. The sample script link is not working anymore though, yet it's quite self-explaining anyways. –  derFunk Jan 14 at 13:24
    
Nice! This is much faster than the other answers on a server with many ports open. Returns in <0.01 seconds for me while netstat / lsof take 1s+ –  Tim Jul 1 at 9:14

You can use netcat for this.

nc ip port < /dev/null

connects to the server and directly closes the connection again. If netcat is not able to connect, it returns a non-zero exit code. The exit code is stored in the variable $?. As an example,

nc ip port < /dev/null; echo $?

will return 0 if and only if netcat could successfully connect to the port.

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This answer needs more upvotes. nc works perfectly for this case. the /dev/tcp trick is clever, but seems difficult to implement a script with signal interrupts. –  Avindra Goolcharan Oct 29 '14 at 19:44
2  
nc has the -z flag for this purpose, which doesn't require taking input from /dev/null. There's already an answer using the -z flag above. –  Abe Voelker Nov 2 '14 at 14:48
    
@AbeVoelker Thanks for pointing out those are the same! –  Tony Nov 3 '14 at 21:37

they're listed in /proc/net/tcp.

it's the second column, after the ":", in hex:

> cat /proc/net/tcp
  sl  local_address rem_address   st tx_queue rx_queue tr tm->when retrnsmt   uid  timeout inode                                                     
   0: 00000000:0016 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 10863 1 ffff88020c785400 99 0 0 10 -1                     
   1: 0100007F:0277 00000000:0000 0A 00000000:00000000 00:00000000 00000000     0        0 7983 1 ffff88020eb7b3c0 99 0 0 10 -1                      
   2: 0500010A:948F 0900010A:2328 01 00000000:00000000 02:00000576 00000000  1000        0 10562454 2 ffff88010040f7c0 22 3 30 5 3                   
   3: 0500010A:E077 5F2F7D4A:0050 01 00000000:00000000 02:00000176 00000000  1000        0 10701021 2 ffff880100474080 41 3 22 10 -1                 
   4: 0500010A:8773 16EC97D1:0050 01 00000000:00000000 02:00000BDC 00000000  1000        0 10700849 2 ffff880104335440 57 3 18 10 -1                 
   5: 0500010A:8772 16EC97D1:0050 01 00000000:00000000 02:00000BF5 00000000  1000        0 10698952 2 ffff88010040e440 46 3 0 10 -1                  
   6: 0500010A:DD2C 0900010A:0016 01 00000000:00000000 02:0006E764 00000000  1000        0 9562907 2 ffff880104334740 22 3 30 5 4                    
   7: 0500010A:AAA4 6A717D4A:0050 08 00000000:00000001 02:00000929 00000000  1000        0 10696677 2 ffff880106cc77c0 45 3 0 10 -1  

so i guess one of those :50 in the third column must be stackoverflow :o)

look in man 5 proc for more details. and picking that apart with sed etc is left as an exercise for the gentle reader...

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ss -tl4 '( sport = 22 )'

2ms is quick enough ?

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1  
Great one, ss is even slighlty faster than nc. l is for listening, 4 is for IPv4; sport stands for (of course) source port. The above command is assuming a listening TCP port (t option): use u option for UDPs, or none of them for both protocols. More info on ss as always on Nixcraft. NOTE: ss filters aren't working here, don't know why (bash 4.3.11, ss utility, iproute2-ss131122), have to go with grep. –  Campa Apr 13 at 7:30

Here's one that works for both Mac and Linux:

netstat -aln | awk '$6 == "LISTEN" && $4 ~ "[\\.\:]445$"'
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I think you can safely remove the [\\.\:]. –  Patrick Oscity Jul 2 '14 at 23:06
nc -l 8000

Where 8000 is the port number. If the port is free, it will start a server that you can close easily. If it isn't it will throw an error:

nc: Address already in use
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