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I want to use the ROW_NUMBER() to get...

  1. To get the max(ROW_NUMBER()) --> Or i guess this would also be the count of all rows

I tried doing:

SELECT max(ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY UserId)) FROM Users

but it didn't seem to work...

  1. To get ROW_NUMBER() using a given piece of information, ie. if I have a name and I want to know what row the name came from.

I assume it would be something similar to what I tried for #1

SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY UserId) From Users WHERE UserName='Joe'

but this didn't work either...

Any Ideas?

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1  
What exactly are you trying to do? –  Michael Petrotta Jun 7 '09 at 1:55
    
BTW, mysql doesn't support this, so I'm editing to re-tag the question. –  Alex Martelli Jun 7 '09 at 4:46
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5 Answers

For the first question, why not just use?

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable

to get the count.

And for the second question, the primary key of the row is what should be used to identify a particular row. Don't try and use the row number for that.


If you returned Row_Number() in your main query,

SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (Order by Id) AS RowNumber, Field1, Field2, Field3
FROM User

Then when you want to go 5 rows back then you can take the current row number and use the following query to determine the row with currentrow -5

SELECT us.Id
FROM (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY id) AS Row, Id
     FROM User ) us 
WHERE Row = CurrentRow - 5
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In my situation I'm given a UserId, and I want to get the UserId that's a certain number of rows back. What if a row gets deleted? In that case, I can't just go UserId - offset, because then I wouldn't get the right record. –  Matt Jun 7 '09 at 2:02
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SELECT num, UserName FROM 
 (SELECT UserName, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY UserId) AS num
  From Users) AS numbered
WHERE UserName='Joe'
share|improve this answer
    
Why the sub select? –  Matt Jun 7 '09 at 2:06
    
To enumerate all rows -- otherwise you're just enumerating the rows where the username is Joe, which is not the goal;-). –  Alex Martelli Jun 7 '09 at 2:26
1  
@Matt: Call me a pedant; I tend to prefer either "derived table" or "anonymous view" to the term "sub select". –  bernie Jun 7 '09 at 2:33
1  
@adam, as I'm a pedant too -- would "nested select" make you happier? I don't like to use terms such as table or view when no TABLE or VIEW keyword is around... but SELECT sure is!-) –  Alex Martelli Jun 7 '09 at 3:10
    
@Alex: you present a valid point. "Nested select" works great for me :) By the way, I really enjoy reading the anecdotes you add to your comments and answers. –  bernie Jun 9 '09 at 4:26
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If you need to return the total table's row count, you can use alternative way instead of SELECT COUNT() statement.
Because SELECT COUNT(
) statement make a full table scan to return the total table's row count, it can take very many time for the large table. There is another way to determine the total row count in a table. You can use sysindexes system table, in this case. There is ROWS column in the sysindexes table. This column contains the total row count for each table in your database. So, you can use the following select statement instead of SELECT COUNT(*):
SELECT rows FROM sysindexes WHERE id = OBJECT_ID('table_name') AND indid < 2
So, you can improve the speed of such queries in several times.

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Thank you, this can help some queries I am doing. –  ThorDivDev Dec 9 '09 at 18:34
    
You are right about the full table scan, but note that it is not necessarily a clustered index scan, as it might use a non-clustered index for that –  yo hal Jul 19 '12 at 15:00
    
Also this is true only for Sql-Server, as other RDMBS have optimized the select count –  yo hal Jul 19 '12 at 15:01
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though I agree with others that you could use count() to get the total number of rows, heres how you can use the row_count():

  1. To get the total no of rows:

    with temp as (
        select row_number() over (order by id) as rownum
        from table_name 
    )
    select max(rownum) from temp
  2. To get the row numbers where name is Matt

    with temp as (
        select name, row_number() over (order by id) as rownum
        from table_name
    )
    select rownum from temp where name like 'Matt'

You can further use min(rownum) or max(rownum) to get the first or last row for Matt respectively.

These were very simple implementations of row_number(). You can use it for more complex grouping. Check out my response on Advanced grouping without using a sub query

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Taking your heading literal, here is a blog entry explaining the so called window functions (where row_number is one of them):

http://www.depesz.com/index.php/2009/01/21/waiting-for-84-window-functions/

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