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This has never worked before - I'm setting the environment up for the first time.

MULTIPLE UPDATES BELOW

I've got my RMI server running in a "daemon" type of process because I want it running at system startup like a service (not using the xinitd feature), so I can utilize SSL, and so I can give commands to the daemon pertaining to what goes into the registry via a separate mechanism. (IOW, I'm not using something like Runtime.getRuntime().exec("rmiregistry 2020");)

I know the RMI server is up and running because this works:

telnet localhost <port>

My client code encodes a lot of the environment varriables for SSL into the command line to start it - later, I'll do it programatically, but for now, it starts with:

$ java -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=/var/RMIssl/truststore -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=<pwd> -Djava.rmi.server.hostname=localhost my.package.Test

At first all I got was:

java.rmi.ConnectException: Connection refused to host: localhost; nested excepti
on is: 
        java.net.ConnectException: Connection refused

which was pretty much useless, except that there was an error. So, I double checked all manner of things, and finally put in some trace statements, with flushes, and added this to the command line:

-Djavax.net.debug=all

This helped coinsiderably, but it was still hard to figure out just where the error was, so I put the suspected line into a loop, catching the exception, and now it's clear it's the lookup for the specific object within the registry that's the problem, though the error message sure seems to be misleading. Here's what I got:

$ java -Djavax.net.debug=all -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=/var/RMIssl/truststore -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword=<pwd> -Djava.rmi.server.hostname=localhost my.package.Test
Setup the security manager.
Find the registry.
Lookup testClient.
keyStore is : 
keyStore type is : jks
keyStore provider is : 
init keystore
init keymanager of type SunX509
trustStore is: /var/RMIssl/truststore 
trustStore type is : jks
trustStore provider is : 
init truststore
adding as trusted cert:
  Subject: CN=   <my cert>
   Issuer: CN=   <my cert>
  Algorithm: RSA; Serial number: 0x<number>
  Valid from  <dates>

trigger seeding of SecureRandom
done seeding SecureRandom
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
java.rmi.ConnectException: Connection refused to host: localhost; nested exception is: 
        java.net.ConnectException: Connection refused
enter 'quit' to exit:
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unavailable cipher suite: TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
Ignoring unsupported cipher suite: TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
java.rmi.ConnectException: Connection refused to host: localhost; nested exception is: 
        java.net.ConnectException: Connection refused
enter 'quit' to exit: 

Note that the loop structure permits better analysis of the error; the output regarding the truststore and my certificate(s) isn't repeated.

This suggests to me that it's not finding a suitable cipher suite to use, but this is all on the same system! The client and server are both looking to the same truststores, etc.

In case someone thinks it helpful, here's the client code:

import java.rmi.*;
import java.rmi.registry.*; 
import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;
import javax.rmi.ssl.*;

public class Test 
{   
   private static String ServerHost = "localhost";
   private static int ServerPort = 6543; private static Registry registry;
   private static testClient c;
   public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception 
   {
      msg("Setup the security manager.");
      System.setSecurityManager(new RMISecurityManager());

      msg("Find the registry.");
      registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry(ServerHost, ServerPort,
       new SslRMIClientSocketFactory());
      msg("Lookup testClient.");
      boolean keepLooping = true;
      while (keepLooping)
      {
         try
         {
            c = (testClient)registry.lookup(testClient.class.getSimpleName());
         }
         catch (Exception e) 
         {
            msg(e.toString());
         }
         keepLooping = !(Prompt("enter 'quit' to exit: ").equals("quit"));
      }
   }
   public static void msg(String message) 
   {
      System.out.println(message); System.out.flush();
   }
   public static String Prompt(String prompt) 
   {
      String out = ""; 
      BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
       try 
      {
         System.out.print(prompt);
         out = br.readLine(); 
      }
      catch (IOException e) 
      {
         msg("IO error reading from standard-in: "+e.toString()); 
      } 
      return out; 
   } 
}

UPDATE ONE:

Following my own hunch, I discovered the environment variable used to set the cipher suites used in the SslRMI socket factories. So, I added this to the server side:

javax.rmi.ssl.client.enabledCipherSuites="TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256,TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256,TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256,TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256,TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256,TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384,TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384,TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256,TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256,TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384,TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384,TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256,TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256,TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256"

This is effectively the entire list that was either "unavailable" or "unsupported" - perhaps it's overkill, but I want the server to take whatever the client has available.

This changed the output considerably! However, it still hangs up on the same statement, this time, with tracing turned off, we get:

java.rmi.ConnectIOException: error during JRMP connection establishment; nested exception is: 
        javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: Remote host closed connection during handshake

When I add tracing, there's a lot of data about which protocol was actually chosen and what it's doing about it and it eventually gets to this (heavily cropped before this excerpt):

...
0080: 00 0F 00 10 00 11 00 02   00 12 00 04 00 05 00 14  ................
0090: 00 08 00 16 00 0B 00 02   01 00                    ..........
main, received EOFException: error
main, handling exception: javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: Remote host closed connection during handshake
main, SEND TLSv1 ALERT:  fatal, description = handshake_failure
main, WRITE: TLSv1 Alert, length = 2
[Raw write]: length = 7
0000: 15 03 01 00 02 02 28                               ......(
main, called closeSocket()
java.rmi.ConnectIOException: error during JRMP connection establishment; nested exception is: 
        javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: Remote host closed connection during handshake

UPDATE TWO:

On the suggestion of EJP, who I respect on this topic from his answers to others, I tested the premise that the server isn't really running the registry, or, at least, not on the system/port combination where the client is looking.

To test this hypothesis I simply start and stop the server and the clients behavior changes substantially. In the case where it's NOT running, I get the long block of alternately "Ignoring unavailable" or "Ignoring unsupported" cipher suites, followed by their names, just as I reported in the first case above.

When the server IS running, the client gives a very different response, sending me very detailed information about the particulars of making the encrypted connection, as I reported in my first update above. Furhter, it says that the remote host closed the connection DURING handshake, so clearly a handshake was underway when it dropped. Additionally, I get this:

$ netstat -n -l | grep <my port number>
tcp        0      0 :::<my port number>         :::*                        LISTEN

I think that's conclusive...

UPDATE THREE:

I noticed that the output had changed somewhat, so I should clarify, etc. Presently when I test, and I'm SURE there's a listener on my port on my system from my registry which is (hopefully) started correctly, using the same truststore and keystore files as the client, I start the client and get a LOT of trace information from SSL including a list of ciphers as noted above, and afterward, it lists a RandomCookie, empty session id, another list of ciphers, some elliptic curves, and dumps a bunch of bytes, which is where the following text picks up:

0080: 00 0F 00 10 00 11 00 02   00 12 00 04 00 05 00 14  ................
0090: 00 08 00 16 00 0B 00 02   01 00                    ..........
[Raw read]: length = 5
0000: 15 03 01 00 02                                     .....
[Raw read]: length = 2
0000: 02 28                                              .(
main, READ: TLSv1 Alert, length = 2
main, RECV TLSv1 ALERT:  fatal, handshake_failure
main, called closeSocket()
main, handling exception: javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: Received fatal alert: handshake_failure
java.rmi.ConnectIOException: error during JRMP connection establishment; nested exception is: 
        javax.net.ssl.SSLHandshakeException: Received fatal alert: handshake_failure

It sure would be nice if we got a clean error message about WHY the handshake was dropped. NOTABLY, I haven't figured out how to get similar output from the server - where does that go? I HAVE provided it with javax.net.debug=all?!?!

UPDATE FOUR:

I wondered if there was a problem with the object that I've registered with the RMI Registry. My original design is to have two object interfaces created. The first gets instantiated and registered. Its job is to create other objects that are instantiated but NOT registered; a client gets the first object from the registry and askes it for the second, and that instance is private to that client. The client then calls methods exposed by the second object, which are executed on the server-side, with results passed back.

To make sure that wasn't playing a role here, I created the following. Note, however, that this did NOT change anything - it's just a lot shorter and thereby is more fitting to include here for full disclosure:

package <myPackage>;

import <myPackage>.*;
import java.rmi.*;

public interface testobject extends Remote
{
   myAPI.Person getObject() throws RemoteException;
}

I then used the interface thus:

package <myPackage>;

import <myPackage>.myAPI;
import <myPackage>.testobject;
import java.rmi.*; 
import java.rmi.server.*; 
public class testObject extends UnicastRemoteObject implements testobject
{

public testObject() throws RemoteException  
{
   // Set the security manager to the RMI security manager, to prevent
   // the client process from using the server in a malicious way.
   try
   {
      if (System.getSecurityManager() == null)
      {
         System.setSecurityManager(new RMISecurityManager());
      }
   }
   catch(Exception e)
   {
      System.out.println("SecurityManager load error: \n"+e);
   }
}

public myAPI.Person getObject() throws RemoteException
{
   myAPI c = new myAPI();
   myAPI.Person TestObject = c.newPerson();
   TestObject.FirstName = "Test";
   TestObject.LastName = "Object";
   return TestObject;
}

}

I then updated the Server code with the following lines:

   try
   {
      testObject TestObject = new testObject();
      OK = true;
   }
   catch (RemoteException e)
   {
      msg("Error instantiating TestObject: \n"+e.toString());
   }
   if (OK)
   {
      name = testObject.class.getSimpleName();
      try
      {
         registry.bind(name, ServerProcess);
         msg("New testObject has been bound to the RMI registry.");
      }
      catch(Exception e)
      {
         msg("The new testObject could not be bound to the RMI registry: \n"+e.toString());
         OK = false;
      }
   }

And finally the client with:

 testObject to;
 try
 {
    msg("Now trying a 'testObject'...");
    to = (testObject)registry.lookup(testObject.class.getSimpleName());
    msg("Well! WE DID NOT THROW AN EXCEPTION!");
    person = to.getObject();
    msg("Name: "+person.FirstName+" "+person.LastName);
 }
 catch (Exception e) 
 {
    msg(e.toString());
 }

Unfortunately, it still throws (the same) exception.

Still going, "hmmm..."

share|improve this question
    
Are you getting the connection refusal on the Registry lookup(), or when calling a remote method on the resulting object? –  EJP Mar 7 '12 at 22:57
    
@EJP It's on the (type)registry.lookup(name)) call. NOTE: I just added some ciphers via javax.rmi.ssl.client.enabledCipherSuites on the server side and it has VERY significantly changed the output, but it still errors out in the same method. I'm about to update the text to include the new data. –  Richard T Mar 7 '12 at 23:14
    
That means the Registry isn't running, or at least not running at the IP:port used in LocateRegistry.getRegistry() or Naming.lookup(), whichever you are using. If it had been on the remote method call, that would have indicated either that the object had been unexported or else that java.rmi.server.hostname was wrong. –  EJP Mar 7 '12 at 23:22
    
@EJP Nice hunch, but it's not true - see my most recent updates. Another guess? -smile- –  Richard T Mar 7 '12 at 23:45
    
The exception doesn't agree with you, does it? If it had been able to connect to a TCP listener at that ip:port it would have done. Instead you got 'connection refused', which has the meaning I stated. The other possibility is that an intervening firewall has rejected the connection request. Can you telnet to that port from the client? –  EJP Mar 8 '12 at 1:06

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