Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following 2 models

class Sport < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :charts, order: "sortWeight ASC"
  has_one :product, :as => :productable
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :product, :allow_destroy => true
end

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :category
  belongs_to :productable, :polymorphic => true
end

A sport can't exist without the product, so in my sports_controller.rb I had:

def new
  @sport = Sport.new
  @sport.product = Product.new
...
end

I tried to move the creation of the product to the sport model, using after_initialize:

after_initialize :create_product

def create_product
 self.product = Product.new
end

I quickly learned that after_initialize is called whenever a model is instantiated (i.e., from a find call). So that wasn't the behavior I was looking for.

Whats the way I should be modeling the requirement that all sport have a product?

Thanks

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Putting the logic in the controller could be the best answer as you stated, but you could get the after_initialize to work by doing the following:

after_initialize :add_product

def add_product
  self.product ||= Product.new
end

That way, it only sets product if no product exists. It may not be worth the overhead and/or be less clear than having the logic in the controller.

Edit: Per Ryan's answer, performance-wise the following would likely be better:

after_initialize :add_product

def add_product
  self.product ||= Product.new if self.new_record?
end
share|improve this answer
    
The problem I have using this solution is that in my case, the product field can be null (so I really need an after_initialize only on create).. if anyone has an idea, would be great, thanks! –  yorch Nov 2 '12 at 0:40
    
@yorch Check out before/after_create. If your logic is too complicated, you probably don't want to hide it in a before/after hook as that could be too magical. –  bostonou Nov 2 '12 at 11:49
    
This method however is not as optimized, once you start selecting large amount of sports/products, you will see that your query is very unoptimized because for every relationship you have you are doing a select statement to see if the product exist –  YaBoyQuy Dec 11 '12 at 20:27
    
@YaBoyQuy You should probably use includes on your query - see the Eager Loading section at api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Associations/… –  bostonou Dec 12 '12 at 18:44
1  
@Eric L, When i first read the problem, i thought that creating a Sport object with a Product is a pre-condition that exists for the model and the business rules tied to it. If it really is, IMO this logic must exist on the domain layer not the view/app layer (which include the controllers). The class method you've suggested is a good option if not all sports must have at least a product –  Rudy Seidinger Nov 7 '13 at 17:31

If you do self.product ||= Product.new it will still search for a product every time you do a find because it needs to check to see if it is nil or not. As a result it will not do any eager loading. In order to do this only when a new record is created you could simply check if it is a new record before setting the product.

after_initialize :add_product

def add_product
  self.product ||= Product.new if self.new_record?
end

I did some basic benchmarking and it doesn't seem to affect performance in any noticeable way.

share|improve this answer
    
Great work with the performance hit by invoking new_record? ! –  conciliator Dec 18 '13 at 12:55
3  
It is also possible to move the new_record? check out of add_product by writing after_initialize :add_product, :if => :new_record?. In some cases that will be better-organized. –  Rory O'Kane Jul 2 '14 at 2:35

You should just override initialize method like

class Sport < ActiveRecord::Base

  # ...

  def initialize(attributes = {})
    super
    self.build_product
    self.attributes = attributes
  end

  # ...

end

Initialize method is never called when record is loaded from database. Notice that in the code above attributes are assigned after product is build. In such setting attribute assignment can affect created product instance.

share|improve this answer
    
You should not do this for a number of reasons detailed here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4376992/… –  tirdadc Jul 15 '14 at 16:04
    
No, there is no reason not to override initialize. Contrary, if you look into rails source code, you'll understand that initialize was meant to be overridden. All you need to do is to call super in your overridden initialize, but it's a rule that is expected to be followed by all ruby developers and rails developers silently expects you to do it. –  Victor Nazarov Jul 17 '14 at 10:40
    
I'd be wary of doing this as it's the kind of thing that can cause confusion, break in future versions, and possibly cause problems for certain third-party gems. unless it's very officially advised. I'm all for general hacks/workarounds, but the constructor is a particularly fragile feature and after_initialize offers a straightforward alternative. –  mahemoff Aug 9 '14 at 8:52

Instead of using after_initialize, how about after_create?

after_create :create_product

def create_product
  self.product = Product.new
  save
end

Does that look like it would solve your issue?

share|improve this answer
3  
This is for the new method in the controller....nothing gets saved to the db yet, so after_create won't be called. –  Tyler DeWitt Mar 7 '12 at 23:03

It looks like you are very close. You should be able to do away with the after_initialize call altogether, but first I believe if your Sport model has a "has_one" relationship with :product as you've indicated, then your Product model should also "belong_to" sport. Add this to your Product model

belongs_to: :sport

Next step, you should now be able to instantiate a Sport model like so

@sport = @product.sport.create( ... )

This is based off the information from Association Basics from Ruby on Rails Guides, which you could have a read through if I am not exactly correct

share|improve this answer
    
The polymorphic association throws this off a bit. A product belongs to a productable (made up word). This is because some products are sports and some are movies (I'm starting with sports). This is my understanding of how to handle inheritance in Rails (other than Single Table Inheritance, which I didn't want). Thanks for the idea though! –  Tyler DeWitt Mar 7 '12 at 23:27
    
Ah I see, I hadn't realized the polymorphic nature of the model, and in turn have realized I don't know how to handle this either. I will continue to look in to it on my own as well. I'll let you know if I come up with anything. –  coderates Mar 8 '12 at 0:30
    
This railscast seems to contain the answer you are looking for. Looks like you use a similar way of creating the new sport as I attempted above. Hope this helps. –  coderates Mar 8 '12 at 1:31
    
Yep, looks like the answer is to put the logic into the controller. That's what some ppl said over at the IRC channel too –  Tyler DeWitt Mar 8 '12 at 2:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.