Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here I am, thinking I know Java, and I get the error Variable 'storage' might not have been initialized. Here is my code:

public class RobbleSet {
    private final Set<Robble> storage; // Error occurs here

    public RobbleSet() {
        storage = new HashSet<Robble>();
    }

    public addRobble(Robble r) {
        storage.add(r); // Error occurs here too
    }
}

storage is initialized in the constructor. What gives?

share|improve this question
1  
You might want to check to make sure that that's the only constructor. If you have multiple constructors, then every one of them will need to initialize storage. Better yet, just write private final Set<Robble> storage = new HashSet<Robble>(); to begin with, and you won't need to put it in a constructor. :-) –  ruakh Mar 7 '12 at 23:04
    
I definitely only have one constructor. Are there any technical differences (on the bytecode / execution level) of initialization at the field rather than in the constructor? –  Bob I Mar 7 '12 at 23:05
    
I just posted an answer -- and I see that you edited your question to say the same thing. Regarding the technical differences between initializing in one place versus the other: Not really. From what I understand, the difference will be transmitted from the source-code to the bytecode (since one version goes in the init method instead of in the constructor), but that shouldn't have any real effect. –  ruakh Mar 7 '12 at 23:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One problem is that you're not declaring a return type for addRobble; you need to change this:

    public addRobble(Robble r) {

to this:

    public void addRobble(Robble r) {

I suspect that this is the problem — that your compiler thinks that addRobble is a misnamed constructor, so is complaining that it fails to initialize storage — but even if it turns out that it's not the problem, it's definitely a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I noticed that too, but I would have thought he'd see a different error in that case. –  BryceAtNetwork23 Mar 7 '12 at 23:11

addRobble doesn't have a return type so the static analyzer is picking it up as a constructor even though it isn't called RobbleSet. The proper code is as follows:

public class RobbleSet {
    private final Set<Robble> storage; // Error occurs here

    public RobbleSet() {
        storage = new HashSet<Robble>();
    }

    public void addRobble(Robble r) {
        storage.add(r); // Error occurs here too
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.