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I'm working with some really large image cubes that are x * y * z in dimension.

Currently I've been dealing with them as such

int ***input = malloc(sizeof(int **)*(lines));
int d;
int i;
for(i = 0 ; i<lines ; i++) {
    input[i] = malloc(sizeof(int *)*bands);

    for(d = 0 ; d<bands ; d++) {
        *input[i][d] = malloc(sizeof(int)*(samples));
    }
}

This has worked fine for me, but now I'm rewriting some of the code and would like to be able to pass the array by reference

I thought to do so required me passing such as foo(&input)

where the function looks like:

foo(int ****input) {
    *input = malloc(sizeof(int **)*(lines));
    int d;
    int i;
    for(i = 0 ; i<lines ; i++) {
        *input[i] = malloc(sizeof(int *)*bands);

        for(d = 0 ; d<bands ; d++) {
            *input[i][d] = malloc(sizeof(int)*(samples));
        }

    }
}

However, I appear to receive seg faults after it enters the first for(i...)` loop. Any suggestions would be very helpful, thank you.

share|improve this question
    
int ****input... o_O –  Mankarse Mar 7 '12 at 23:03
1  
There's no "passing by reference" in C, you're always passing by value. In this case your value is a pointer. Semantics, maybe, but may help you understand better what you're doing... Also, have you considered typedefs? Ah, and check for malloc failures, for someone's sake, please! –  littleadv Mar 7 '12 at 23:04
    
@Mankarse lol, I know it seems ridiculous, but is that not the right syntax? –  Ponml Mar 7 '12 at 23:05
    
@littleadv I'm not very familiar with typedef. I assume this will syntactically remove the **** notation? –  Ponml Mar 7 '12 at 23:06
    
Not only does it simplifies the notation, it will also help you understand which pointer you're working with at any given time, and allow you using temporary variables of the right type instead of a generic *int everywhere. That way a strict compiler will warn you on mismatches. –  littleadv Mar 7 '12 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is fine when input is the pointer to the 3D vector:

/* original */
input[i] = malloc(sizeof(int *)*bands);

When input becomes an int ****: a pointer to the vector pointer, this change is incorrect:

/* original */
*input[i] = malloc(sizeof(int *)*bands);

You want:

/* original */
(*input)[i] = malloc(sizeof(int *)*bands);

In C, *x[y] means *(x[y]).

A much simpler thing would be to use a local variable:

void function(int ****pinput)
{
  int ***input = malloc(/* ... */);
  /*...code stays the same as before...*/
  *pinput = input; /* place it in the location specified by caller */
}

Also, let's make a few stylistic adjustments to the original. (Ignoring the lack of malloc failure checking):

int ***input = malloc(lines * sizeof *input);

int d;
int i;

for(i = 0 ; i<lines ; i++) {
    input[i] = malloc(bands * sizeof *input[0]);

    /* Noticed an error here: you have *input[i][d] = ... 
       but input[i][d] the pointer to the band;
       *input[i][d] is input[i][d][0]! */
    for(d = 0 ; d<bands ; d++)
        input[i][d] = malloc(samples * sizeof *input[0][0]);
}

I just took out some unnecessary parentheses and changed the sizeof calculation so that instead of repeating (int **), etc, it is based off the type of the pointer expression being assigned to.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Index has precedence over de-reference. en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/operator_precedence –  littleadv Mar 7 '12 at 23:09
    
Or, more generally, postfix operators are higher precedence than unary. –  Kaz Mar 7 '12 at 23:14
    
Many thanks, I will test this when I can get back to work code. Cheers. –  Ponml Mar 7 '12 at 23:19
    
I added backticks to some raw code where *'s got misinterpreted as markup. Sorry! –  Kaz Mar 7 '12 at 23:45

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