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I'm developing a new version of a CLI utility which generates accessors and would like to add a decorate feature.

In order to implement that, I would like to know what is the best way to implement a decorator in C++ and eventually C++11.

For example, with such an interface:

class IHello
{
public:
    virtual void hello(std::string name) = 0;
};

I have two possibility, either I copy the parameter name again to pass it to the object, or I created an rvalue reference with std::move semantic.

I thus have two different decorator. The first passing arguments by copy:

class HelloCopy : public IHello
{
public:
    HelloCopy(IHello& instance)
        :instance (instance)
    {
    }

    virtual void hello(std::string name) override
    {
        this->instance.hello(name);
    }

private:
    IHello& instance;
};

The second passing argument by rvalue-reference:

class HelloRValue : public IHello
{
public:
    HelloRValue(IHello& instance)
        :instance (instance)
    {
    }

    virtual void hello(std::string name) override
    {
        this->instance.hello(std::move(name));
    }

private:
    IHello& instance;
};

My question is: What is the best (most efficient) way to implement a decorator?

I could also make the decorated method's argument and rvalue reference, but as I want to comply with the interface (hence the explicit override), I can't change it.

share|improve this question
    
Why not using const references down to the decorated object that may decide to make a copy at that stage ? –  J.N. Mar 7 '12 at 23:40
1  
@J.N. I won't always have the control on the interface to decorate, and it may not be a expected behavior. In case of reference there is no problem, as I simply reuse it (or std::forward in case of rvalue reference). –  Geoffroy Mar 7 '12 at 23:43
    
Why the instance reference? –  Xeo Mar 8 '12 at 0:03
    
@Xeo If should keep a reference to the underlying object –  Geoffroy Mar 8 '12 at 0:04
    
Yeah, but why? Your HelloXXX is the underlying object already, you inherit from it. Just do this->IHello::hello(std::move(name)). –  Xeo Mar 8 '12 at 0:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You seem to have a misconception of what moving really means:

A move is just a better copy.

As such, a move is never worse than a copy, and if the type contains external data, it is always faster (assuming a sane move constructor).

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Thus you would preferably use the rvalue-reference form? –  Geoffroy Mar 7 '12 at 23:58
    
@Geoffroy: I'd rather have it called HelloMove, but yes. –  Xeo Mar 8 '12 at 0:10
    
Okay, thank you for your point of view. The name was just for the example. So using such a construct, would it copy the value only once? –  Geoffroy Mar 8 '12 at 6:50
    
@Xeo: do you know if in the OP's question for the HelloCopy case the compiler is allowed to move from name instead of copying ? It seems unlikely to me (supposing we output the string in the destructor, the result would change), but it does look like an inserting opportunity. –  Matthieu M. Mar 8 '12 at 7:25
    
@Matthieu: According to the standard, the compiler is only allowed to insert a std::move when returning a local variable (aka, when copy elision could be performed, but isn't for whatever reason). –  Xeo Mar 8 '12 at 13:22

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