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In my ASP.NET MVC application, I have a form and I'm using a ViewModel, so the ModelBinder can bind to my Strongly Typed Class. I'm using DataAnnotations for validation

public class FormViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public string SomeValue {get;set;}

    [Range(0, 10, ErrorMessage="Enter a number between 0 and 10.")]
    public byte? SomeOtherValue {get;set;}

}

This works great. The problem however is when the user doesn't enter a valid value for the SomeOtherValue (like abc), a standard MVC-error pops up: 'The value 'abc' is not valid for 'SomeOtherValue'. This is really annoying, as I can't customize this message. I know there are ways to Localize this message, but that just doesn't make sense (I don't want a general message, I want a value-specific value).

I tried applying a RegularExpression-attribute to the 'SomeOtherValue', which only allows byte-values, but probably the standard-validation 'overrides' this validation. Is there some way to apply a custom 'the value is not valid' message for a property, or otherwise disable the standard-message?

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2 Answers 2

You can create your own SpecialRangeAttribute (not with that awful class name though) which could specify error messages based on the values input.

Here's one I created (AFAIK) to make sure a date input was always greater than a certain date:

public class MinimumDateAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    private const string DefaultErrorMessage = "'{0}' must be a date greater than {1:d}.";

    public DateTime MinDate { get; set; }

    public MinimumDateAttribute(DateTime minDate)
        : base(DefaultErrorMessage)
    {
        this.MinDate = minDate;
    }

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (value == null || !(value is DateTime))
        {
            return true;
        }
        DateTime dateValue = (DateTime)value;
        return this.MinDate <= dateValue;
    }

    public override string FormatErrorMessage(string name)
    {
        return string.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, DefaultErrorMessage, name, this.MinDate);
    }
}

The value object passed into IsValid is the user's input. You could include it in the error message. Also, see this post from Scott Guthrie's blog for some more detail on MVC model validation.

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Are you sure a custom Attribute 'overrides' the standard message? I'll try it out! –  Pbirkoff Mar 7 '12 at 23:47
    
@Pbirkoff: It should, as long as you override the FormatErrorMessage(string name) method. –  Cory Mar 7 '12 at 23:50
    
This does not work :{ –  HoopSnake Apr 21 '12 at 0:46
    
@JustinOehlmann: Any particular reason you have for it not working? This is how all MVC validation attributes are built -- perhaps you have a configuration issue? –  Cory Apr 23 '12 at 14:07
    
It is a message from teh default model binder that is firing before your custom Validatiopn attribute...in my case I had the string "null" trying to bind to bool? which caused the error & the fix was simply to have empty string "" bind to bool? etc –  HoopSnake Apr 23 '12 at 22:44
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Here is a different (non-ideal way, IMHO) to fix it if the custom validation attribute is not working for you. In the controller:

if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
    string fieldName = "ThatFieldName";
    var m = ViewData.ModelState[fieldName];

    if (m != null && m.Errors.Count > 0)
    {
        ViewData.ModelState.Remove(fieldName);
        ViewData.ModelState.AddModelError(fieldName, "You mucked that field up.");
    }
}
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Of course, this will replace all errors for that field with that message... you can do extra checks and only replace the error if it starts with "the value", etc. –  MikeSmithDev Oct 10 '13 at 20:51
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