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I'm running into an issue with Entity Framework code-first in MVC3. I'm hitting this exception:

An object with the same key already exists in the ObjectStateManager. The ObjectStateManager cannot track multiple objects with the same key.

This is addressed many times on SO, but I'm having trouble utilizing any of the suggested solutions in my situation.

Here is a code sample:

FestORM.SaleMethod method = new FestORM.SaleMethod
{
    Id = 2,
    Name = "Test Sale Method"
};
FestContext context = new FestContext();

//everything works without this line:
string thisQueryWillMessThingsUp = 
    context.SaleMethods.Where(m => m.Id == 2).Single().Name;

context.Entry(method).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified;
 context.SaveChanges();

EDITED to clarify: I am attempting to update an object that already exists in the database.

Everything works fine without the query noted in the code. In my application, my controller is instantiating the context, and that same context is passed to several repositories that are used by the controller--so I am not able to simply use a different context for the initial query operation. I've tried to remove the entity from being tracked in the ObjectStateManager, but I can't seem to get anywhere with that either. I'm trying to figure out a solution that will work for both conditions: sometimes I will be updating an object that is tracked by the ObjectStateManager, and sometimes it will happen to have not been tracked yet.

FWIW, my real repository functions look like this, just like the code above:

public void Update(T entity)
{
    //works ONLY when entity is not tracked by ObjectStateManager
    _context.Entry(entity).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified; 
}

public void SaveChanges()
{
    _context.SaveChanges();
}

Any ideas? I've been fighting this for too long...

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The problem is that this query

string thisQueryWillMessThingsUp =  
    context.SaleMethods.Where(m => m.Id == 2).Single().Name; 

brings one instance of the SaleMethod entity into the context and then this code

context.Entry(method).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified;

attaches a different instance to the context. Both instances have the same primary key, so EF thinks that you are trying to attach two different entities with the same key to the context. It doesn't know that they are both supposed to be the same entity.

If for some reason you just need to query for the name, but don't want to actually bring the full entity into the context, then you can do this:

string thisQueryWillMessThingsUp =           
    context.SaleMethods.Where(m => m.Id == 2).AsNoTracking().Single().Name; 

If what you are tying to do is update an existing entity and you have values for all mapped properties of that entity, then the simplest thing to do is to not run the query and just use:

context.Entry(method).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified;

If you don't want to update all properties, possibly because you don't have values for all properties, then querying for the entity and setting properties on it before calling SaveChanges is an acceptable approach. There are several ways to do this depending on your exact requirements. One way is to use the Property method, something like so:

var salesMethod = context.SaleMethods.Find(2); // Basically equivalent to your query
context.Entry(salesMethod).Property(e => e.Name).CurrentValue = newName;
context.Entry(salesMethod).Property(e => e.SomeOtherProp).CurrentValue = newOtherValue;
context.SaveChanges();

These blog posts contain some additional information that might be helpful:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2011/01/29/using-dbcontext-in-ef-feature-ctp5-part-4-add-attach-and-entity-states.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2011/01/30/using-dbcontext-in-ef-feature-ctp5-part-5-working-with-property-values.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. (It won't let me vote up your response because I'm new.) The problem with this is that I don't know when I am doing a query that precedes a future update. The query may be buried somewhere in the service layer, and then ultimately, when I go to do an update on that same entity that was queried, I hit the error. Is there a way that I can remove the object from the context tracking, or get ahold of the object that is being tracked by the context, and communicate to the context that I am indeed updating this one object in question? I've researched some in this direction, but no luck yet. –  Josh Mar 8 '12 at 17:11
    
It depends what the intention of the query is. If the query is intended to bring an entity into the context so that it can be updated and saved, which is usual, then you should design for that, possibly by ensuring before you save that the entity is brought in then if it hasn't been brought in before. If the intention of the query is to get some property of the entity from the database for some reason without bringing the entity into the context, then use AsNoTracking on that query as shown above. –  Arthur Vickers Mar 8 '12 at 17:22
    
To add to my previous comment, if you want to ensure that the entity has been brought in, then use the Find method before updating properties in the entity and saving. You could also use a query instead of Find--by default the query will only bring in the entity if it is not already in the context. But Find is more efficient. –  Arthur Vickers Mar 8 '12 at 17:24
    
Currently I have a bunch of properties being returned by a viewmodel. The viewmodel also contians the ID of the item being updated. I am instantiating a new object with this data. The viewmodel does not contain all the properties of the underlying model, so I am fetching these missing properties via a query, to populate into my new (updated) object. I am then trying to save (update) the object. Instead, I just need to do a query to grab my object first, and then update the properties on that object with the info from the returned viewmodel (rather than doing the reverse). Sound right? –  Josh Mar 8 '12 at 19:19
    
Sounds like it should work. –  Arthur Vickers Mar 8 '12 at 19:26

The obvious answer would be that your not actually saving the method object to the database before you call:

//everything works without this line:
string thisQueryWillMessThingsUp = context.SaleMethods.Where(m => m.Id == 2).Single().Name;

However, I think perhaps this is just a bit a code you left out. What if you make your entities inherit from an abstract class ie.

public abstract class BaseClass
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
}

Then update your Repository to

public class Repository<T> where T : BaseClass
{
 .....
    public void Update(T entity)
    {        
        _context.Entry(entity).State = entity.Id == 0 ? System.Data.EntityState.Added : System.Data.EntityState.Modified; 
    }
}

Also you might want to not set the ID of your SaleMethod and let it be generated by the database. Problem could also be because SaleMethod Object in the database has Id of 2 and then you try to add another SaleMethod object with Id 2. The error you see stems from trying to add another SaleMethod object with ID of 2 to the ObjectStateManager.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. Yes, the IDs are generated by the database for sure. This is specifically an update operation. I did leave out the part where the object is initially saved (could have been initially saved by another piece of code years ago, etc.). The thing is, the update works just fine, as long as you don't perform a query first. Performing the query apparently adds it to the ObjectStateManager's tracking, at which point my update squawks. –  Josh Mar 8 '12 at 1:22

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