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Is it possible to rename the variables of a struct when using typedef?

typedef struct {
    float x;
    float y;
    float z;
} Vector;

typedef Vector {
    float r;
    float g;
    float b;
} Color;
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Presumably you mean some sort of typedef that would let you say: "a Color is the same as a Vector, but with the names x, y and z changed to r, g and b, respectively"?

If so, the answer is no, C doesn't provide that (nor can I think of anything it provides that would be a reasonably close substitute).

Edit: you can, however, have a function operate on either one pretty easily:

typedef union { 
    Color c;
    Vector v;
} cv;

int my_func(cv *value);

C guarantees that the initial sequence of items with the same types in the same order (which, in this case is all of them) can be worked with via either selector equally. In other words, if you put a Vector into your cv and pass it to a function, the function can work with those three items as either r, g and b or as x, y and z without any problem (e.g., if it writes to g, that will change y, if you view it as a Vector instead of a Color).

Edit: C99, §6.5.2.3/5:

One special guarantee is made in order to simplify the use of unions: if a union contains several structures that share a common initial sequence (see below), and if the union object currently contains one of these structures, it is permitted to inspect the common initial part of any of them anywhere that a declaration of the complete type of the union is visible. Two structures share a common initial sequence if corresponding members have compatible types (and, for bit-fields, the same widths) for a sequence of one or more initial members.

In this case, all the members of c and v have the same types in the same order, so this rule applies to the entirety of either member. Rereading things, however, this only allows you to "inspect" the common initial sequence, which probably doesn't include writing to it (though I find it hard to imagine how you'd make reading from any member work without making writing work as well).

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I tried to set this up, but if I do cvPointer->x I get an error, and if I do cvPointer->v->x I get an error. –  Stas Jaro Mar 8 '12 at 1:13
    
I thought reading a member of a union that was not written to last exhibits UB. Or does this only hold for C++? –  Christian Rau Mar 8 '12 at 1:14
    
@stas It's cvPointer->v.x, of course. –  Christian Rau Mar 8 '12 at 1:14
    
@ChristianRau - I can't remember whether it's implementation defined or undefined, but I didn't think it was guaranteed to work. It's called "type punning" FTR. –  detly Mar 8 '12 at 1:17
    
@detly: see the last edit in the answer -- in this case, it's defined behavior (at least to read the data). –  Jerry Coffin Mar 8 '12 at 2:37

No, you can't do that. You need to declare a new structure type:

typedef struct {
    float x;
    float y;
    float z;
} Vector;

typedef struct {
    float r;
    float g;
    float b;
} Color;
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Could I make a function support both? I guess I could simply make it take void* as the argument and assume that it would be a 3 float struct... –  Stas Jaro Mar 8 '12 at 0:59
    
Yes, you could do that. Be careful. If you want real polymorphism, you need to use a language that better supports that paradigm. –  Carl Norum Mar 8 '12 at 0:59
    
Then you're in the area of using the C compiler as an assembler. In C, two different are distinct types even if they have the same structure. Using an object of one type as another is not well-defined. Between separate translation units, though, structures are structurally compatible (if they have the same types of members in the same order with the same names). This is because struct types must be separately defined in each translation unit (even the same type from the same header file). They cannot actually /be/ the same type between different compile jobs. –  Kaz Mar 8 '12 at 1:03

I don't think that's possible...the closest thing would just be making the second one and copying the first one into the second, but there is no reflection (closest concept AFAIK) in C.

Edit-You are talking about renaming the members of the structure right? These symbols get mapped during compile-time. You could maybe mess with the symbol table, but I doubt it and that seems like enormous overkill, not to mention dangerous.

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The thing to do is to have functional abstraction.

Gist:

typedef Vector Color; /* a color is a kind of vector */

float color_red(Color *c)
{ 
  return c->x;
}

Everywhere else, you use color_red(c) and not c->x.

I run into this all the time in Lisp programming. I want a pair of things and the best tool is the cons cell. The cons cell has fields called CAR and CDR. That's okay, just write some other functions which wrap these under different names. (CAR and CDR are also called FIRST and REST, for clarifying obvious list uses.)

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As the other answers have said, NO. But I've heard C11 to support anonymous structs, so the good old

typedef union
{
    struct
    {
        float x, y, z;
    };
    struct
    {
        float r, g, b;
    };
} Vector;

typedef Vector Color;

might also do.

Of course heavily intermixing the use of x, y and z with that of r, g and b can exhibit undefined behaviour, but c'mon there's no implementation where reading r doesn't reliably give the value just written to x.

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