Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of strings, from which I want to locate every line that has 'http://' in it, but does not have 'lulz', 'lmfao', '.png', or any other items in a list of strings in it. How would I go about this?

My instincts tell me to use regular expressions, but I have a moral objection to witchcraft.

share|improve this question
2  
+1 for a "moral objection to witchcraft". –  prelic Mar 8 '12 at 1:03
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here is an option that is fairly extensible if the list of strings to exclude is large:

exclude = ['lulz', 'lmfao', '.png']
filter_func = lambda s: 'http://' in s and not any(x in s for x in exclude)

matching_lines = filter(filter_func, string_list)

List comprehension alternative:

matching_lines = [line for line in string_list if filter_func(line)]
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! I get to use lambda! I knew it existed for some reason! –  directedition Mar 8 '12 at 1:23
1  
You don't have to. lambda allows you to define the function inline instead of setting up a variable filter_func; but you could just as easily write def filter_func(s): return 'http://' in s and not any(x in s for x in exclude). Remember, functions are objects. –  Karl Knechtel Mar 8 '12 at 2:46
    
I would even say this is an inappropriate use of lambda. There is no reason to prefer it to a def here. –  wim Mar 8 '12 at 3:42
add comment

This is almost equivalent to F.J's solution, but uses generator expressions instead of lambda expressions and the filter function:

haystack = ['http://blah', 'http://lulz', 'blah blah', 'http://lmfao']
exclude = ['lulz', 'lmfao', '.png']

http_strings = (s for s in haystack if s.startswith('http://'))
result_strings = (s for s in http_strings if not any(e in s for e in exclude))

print list(result_strings)

When I run this it prints:

['http://blah']
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for generators. But, note that you can do this as a(n almost) one-liner: result_strings = [s for s in haystack if s.startswith('http://') and not any(e in s for e in exclude)]. It needs a line break to fit 80 columns (per most style guides), but I would argue it is slightly easier to follow than the two-generator version. timeit also reports that this is a fair bit faster, and also slightly faster than F.J's filter version (which, IMO, is the hardest to follow of the three). –  lvc Mar 8 '12 at 1:43
add comment

Try this:

for s in strings:
    if 'http://' in s and not 'lulz' in s and not 'lmfao' in s and not '.png' in s:
        # found it
        pass

Other option, if you need your options more flexible:

words = ('lmfao', '.png', 'lulz')
for s in strings:
    if 'http://' in s and all(map(lambda x, y: x not in y, words, list(s * len(words))):
        # found it
        pass
share|improve this answer
    
That was my first approach. But as my list grew and the line became unwieldy, I was hoping there was a better way. –  directedition Mar 8 '12 at 1:06
1  
That could get out of hand if he ever wanted to extend the list of stop words. How would you change your approach? But still, +1 for simple solutions. –  prelic Mar 8 '12 at 1:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.