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I am learning from the book Python for Absolute Beginners and am up to the chapter on exceptions. The authors explanations have been increasingly short, and with this piece of code, i am completely confused and there is no explanation! Can someone explain please, line by line?

#!/usr/bin/env python
store = []
try: {}["foo"]
except KeyError as e: store.append(e)
try: 1/0
except ZeroDivisionError as e: store.append(e)
try: "".bar()
except AttributeError as e: store.append(e)
for exceptionobject in store:
    ec = exceptionobject.__class__
    print(ec.__name__)
    indent = " +-"
    while ec.__bases__:
        ec = ec.__bases__[0]
        print(indent + ec.__name__)
        indent = " " + indent
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
# create a list
store = [] 

try:
    # if something in this block would throw an exception,
    # code could continue in a controlled way in an except block

    # force a KeyError by looking up a non-existent key in an empty dictionary
    {}["foo"] 

except KeyError as e: 
    # store the exception object in the list
    store.append(e)

# same scheme here; construct something that fails (1/0), 
# then instead of quitting the interpreter, continue operations
try: 
    1/0
except ZeroDivisionError as e: 
    store.append(e)

# pythons exceptions hierarchy is diverse and exceptions carry meaningful
# names expressing their context
try:
    # here we attept to lookup an attribute (that's happening technically
    # before the call), which does not exists (because strings don't know
    # how to bar... 
    "".bar()

except AttributeError as e:
    # ... and the the appropriate exception here is AttributeError
    store.append(e)

At this point the list has three elements, which are exception objects.

# loop over list
for exceptionobject in store:

    # get the class of the object via special method __class__
    # __class__ returns an object whose class is type actually;
    # but don't be too confused by this 
    ec = exceptionobject.__class__

    # print the name of the exception class, now this is just a plain string
    print(ec.__name__)

    indent = " +-"

    # use another special method __bases__ to get all superclasses
    # of the exception class; all exceptions inherit from BaseException
    # loop over the base classes
    while ec.__bases__:

        # get the first base class
        ec = ec.__bases__[0]

        # print its name an indent more
        print(indent + ec.__name__)
        indent = " " + indent

The result should look something like this:

KeyError
 +-LookupError
  +-StandardError
   +-Exception
    +-BaseException
     +-object
ZeroDivisionError
 +-ArithmeticError
  +-StandardError
   +-Exception
    +-BaseException
     +-object
AttributeError
 +-StandardError
  +-Exception
   +-BaseException
    +-object

showing a part of the exception hierarchy.

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In the first half (the one with the three except clauses) it forces the very same exceptions it's catching (you catch exceptions with the except keyword), then in the exception handler (the code just after the keyword; it runs when the exception occurs, or is raised) it adds each exception to a list.

In the second half it iterates over the saved exceptions (the ones now in the list) and shows you some of their attributes.

From this exercise you should probably take away mainly how you catch exceptions, and only secondarily the fact that an Exception is an object, like everything in Python:

In [6]: KeyError.__class__
Out[6]: type

'type' is the class of classes in Python - that's pretty much a quirk of the language, if you don't get this you shouldn't worry about it anytime soon. Anyway, this bit shows that an exception is a class.

In [7]: err = KeyError()
In [8]: err.__class__
Out[8]: KeyError

Here we instantiate a KeyError object, which is something that happens automatically when a KeyError exception occurs (err in this case is the same as e in the exception handlers in your code). As you can see, the class of err is KeyError as expected.

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