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I am using Netbeans, and I want it so a text field is only editable when the user clicks the check box. I have it so when they select the check box it makes the text field editable, but how do I make it so when they de-select the check box the text field becomes un-editable again?

The code I used to make it editable is -

private void chk4By6MouseClicked(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
    txt4By6.setEditable(true);
}
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3 Answers

Use ItemListener, so that you can enable or disable the JTextField depending on if JCheckBox is SELECTED or DESELECTED respectively.

A sample program :

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class ModifyTextField 
{
    public static void createAndDisplayGUI()
    {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame("MODIFY TEXTFIELD");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setLocationByPlatform(true);

        final JPanel contentPane = new JPanel();

        final JTextField tfield = new JTextField(10);
        tfield.setEnabled(false);

        final JCheckBox cbox = new JCheckBox("Enable TEXTFIELD", false);

        ItemListener itemListener = new ItemListener()
        {
            public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent ie)
            {
                tfield.setEnabled(ie.getStateChange() == ItemEvent.SELECTED)
            }
        };
        cbox.addItemListener(itemListener);

        contentPane.add(cbox);
        contentPane.add(tfield);

        frame.getContentPane().add(contentPane);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String... args)
    {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                createAndDisplayGUI();
            }
        });
    }
}

Outcome :

DESELECTED and SELECTED

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nitpick: you don't need an if-else block to set the enabled property :-) –  kleopatra Mar 8 '12 at 15:21
    
@kleopatra : Nah, that else-if is to set it back to disabled if you will deselect the checkbox. If i will keep only one, then if it's enabled once, it will remain as is :-) Won't it ? The OP wants both conditions to be satisfied, if JCheckBox is selected JTextField is enabled and JCheckBox is deselected JTextField be disabled. –  nIcE cOw Mar 8 '12 at 15:41
    
hint: the required enabled property has the same value as the expression tested in the if block :-) –  kleopatra Mar 8 '12 at 15:44
    
@kleopatra : Please do elaborate today no hints :-) My head is really not working today to be true, please, might be I will learn something that is missing from my CPU :-) –  nIcE cOw Mar 8 '12 at 15:48
2  
field.setEnabled(ie.getStateChange() == SELECTED) –  kleopatra Mar 8 '12 at 16:17
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See: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/events/actionlistener.html

Read the whole thing if you really want to learn how this works.

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1  
+1, for the link. I will go with the Tutorial to get my things done, for better clarity :-). But it will be much wiser if you go with ItemListener, so that you can catch both SELECTED and DESELECTED events for enabling and disabling the JTextField –  nIcE cOw Mar 8 '12 at 6:39
1  
@GagandeepBali Action vs. ItemListener is mainly a matter of taste and context, f.i. binding or application frameworks might make it easier to use the one or other :-) –  kleopatra Mar 8 '12 at 15:26
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Have you considered:

private void chk4By6MouseClicked(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
    txt4By6.setEditable(!txt4By6.isEditble());
}

Or maybe even... (assuming chk4By6 is a swing checkbox)

private void chk4By6MouseClicked(java.awt.event.MouseEvent evt) {
    txt4By6.setEditable(chk4By6.isSelected());
}

And a third method might be:

private void chk4By6ActionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
    txt4By6.setEditable(chk4By6.isSelected());
}
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The third method is the best, IMHO. ActionListeners are the way to go. –  Peter Mar 8 '12 at 6:09
    
-1 for repeating the OP's incorrect lead (listening to low level mouse events instead of semantic events) –  kleopatra Mar 8 '12 at 15:24
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