Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am calling a PHP script whenever a webpage loads. However, there is a parameter that the PHP script needs to run (which I normally pass through the command line when I am testing the script).

How can I pass this argument every time the script is run when the page loads?

share|improve this question
    
How do you run it? –  zerkms Mar 8 '12 at 2:36
1  
Can you post your code, please? –  SenorAmor Mar 8 '12 at 2:37
    
so you want to run a command line? or a php script? –  Christopher Pelayo Mar 8 '12 at 2:41
    
Okay, thank you guys. I got the answers below: use $GET and pass it as a parameter value in the url itself. –  Nick Mar 8 '12 at 8:28
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Presumably you're passing the arguments in on the command line as follows:

php /path/to/wwwpublic/path/to/script.php arg1 arg2

... and then accessing them in the script thusly:

<?php
// $argv[0] is '/path/to/wwwpublic/path/to/script.php'
$argument1 = $argv[1];
$argument2 = $argv[2];
?>

What you need to be doing when passing arguments through HTTP (accessing the script over the web) is using the query string and access them through the $_GET superglobal:

Go to http://yourdomain.com/path/to/script.php?argument1=arg1&argument2=arg2

... and access:

<?php
$argument1 = $_GET['argument1'];
$argument2 = $_GET['argument2'];
?>

If you want to all the script to run regardless of where you call it from (command line or from the browser) you'll want something like the following:

<?php
// I actually went back and tested, and $_GET is indeed set even for command line
// execution, this may depend on your php.ini settings.  $argv suffers from the same
// ambiguity, so isset($argv) may not work either, though it's far less likely to
// be set when accessing over the web.  If you find this doesn't work, try testing
// for an argument count in $argc
if (isset($argv)) {
    $argument1 = $argv[1];
    $argument2 = $argv[2];
}
else {
    $argument1 = $_GET['argument1'];
    $argument2 = $_GET['argument2'];
}
?>
share|improve this answer
1  
Your last code sample will throw notices –  zerkms Mar 8 '12 at 2:53
    
perhaps "if (isset($_GET))" –  Jason Mar 8 '12 at 3:26
    
I would use empty($_GET). $_GET is a predefined value, so I'm pretty sure it is always set, but empty if there are no GET parameters set. empty() returns false for empty strings and arrays. –  Tim S. Mar 7 '13 at 8:15
    
Without actually checking, I do believe that $_GET is in fact not set if the script is called in a command line context. empty() would cause it to look for command line arguments if the script is accessed from the web without a query string, thus throwing more notices. –  Jason Mar 13 '13 at 0:28
    
$argv[0] isn't actually arg1 in your 1st example, it would be "/path/to/wwwpublic/path/to/script.php". (php.net/manual/en/reserved.variables.argv.php) –  CasualT Jun 3 '13 at 17:22
show 2 more comments
$argv[0]; // the script name
$argv[1]; // the first parameter
$argv[2]; // the second parameter

If you want to all the script to run regardless of where you call it from (command line or from the browser) you'll want something like the following:

<?php
if ($_GET) {
    $argument1 = $_GET['argument1'];
    $argument2 = $_GET['argument2'];
} else {
    $argument1 = $argv[1];
    $argument2 = $argv[2];
}
?>

To call from command line chmod 755 /var/www/webroot/index.php and use

/usr/bin/php /var/www/webroot/index.php arg1 arg2

To call from the browser, use

http://www.mydomain.com/index.php?argument1=arg1&argument2=arg2
share|improve this answer
add comment

To retrieve a parameter value invoking script, eg, http://localhost/script.php?param=value, use:

$paramValue = $_GET['param'];
share|improve this answer
    
It is command line argument, not URL –  zerkms Mar 8 '12 at 2:52
    
the question was "How can I pass this argument every time the script is run when the page loads ?"... –  nad2000 Mar 9 '12 at 1:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.