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What is time complexity of C#'s List<T>.Sort()

I guess it's o(N)

But after I searched a lot, I didn't get any accurate result.

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Do you mean List.Sort, or List<T>.Sort? – John Saunders Mar 8 '12 at 2:37
    
List<T>.sort sorry – Anders Lind Mar 8 '12 at 2:37
up vote 16 down vote accepted

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b0zbh7b6.aspx

This method uses Array.Sort, which uses the QuickSort algorithm. This implementation performs an unstable sort; that is, if two elements are equal, their order might not be preserved. In contrast, a stable sort preserves the order of elements that are equal.

On average, this method is an O(n log n) operation, where n is Count; in the worst case it is an O(n ^ 2) operation.

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From the documentation:

On average, this method is an O(n log n) operation, where n is Count; in the worst case it is an O(n ^ 2) operation.

This is because it uses Quicksort. While this is typically O(n log n), as mentioned on Wikipedia, "Quicksort is often faster in practice than other O(n log n) algorithms"

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Adding some information from the recent addition to MSDN on this topic, for framework 4.5, List.Sort method uses a different Sort Strategy depending on the number of elements and partitions.

This method uses the Array.Sort method which applies the introspective sort as follows:

  • If the partition size is fewer than 16 elements, it uses an insertion sort algorithm.
  • If the number of partitions exceeds 2 * LogN, where N is the range of the input array, it uses a Heapsort algorithm.
  • Otherwise, it uses a Quicksort algorithm.

This implementation performs an unstable sort; that is, if two elements are equal, their order might not be preserved. In contrast, a stable sort preserves the order of elements that are equal.

On average, this method is an O(n log n) operation, where n is Count; in the worst case it is an O(n ^ 2) operation.

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best it can be asymptotically is O(nlogn)

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1  
What an eyesore of a comment thread. Try again. Or if you can't discuss this without making jabs at somebody's education or background, don't bother. – BoltClock Mar 8 '12 at 3:58
    
@Tom: yep, I was wrong – zerkms Mar 8 '12 at 4:16

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