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Query

SELECT 
   c.class_id,
   count(s.student_id) as total_students 
FROM 
   classes c
   LEFT JOIN students s ON c.class_id = s.class_id
GROUP BY c.class_id;

expected result

445 15
448 19
451  9
455 0
478 0
489 0
501 84

But this is the result of above query

445 15
448 19
451  9
455 0
501 84

if I suppress id:455 by the where clause, it shows 478 as 0. Somehow its grouping over the zero..

PS: its late at night and my brains are fried

---- EDIT --- The solution below works but this doesn't: (added a condtion to filter students). This query eliminates all 0's

SELECT c.class_id,
       SUM
       (
        CASE
         WHEN s.student_id IS NULL THEN 0
         ELSE 1
        END
       ) as total_students 
  FROM classes c LEFT JOIN students s ON c.class_id = s.class_id WHERE s.student_type='instate'
GROUP BY c.class_id;
share|improve this question
1  
PS: its late at night and my brains are fried - you have multiple brains, lucky you! :) –  icyrock.com Mar 8 '12 at 2:50
    
nope, just two; left and right ! –  Stewie Mar 8 '12 at 2:57
add comment

2 Answers 2

I guess the NULL values of s.student_id values in the COUNT aggregate function could be cause.

Try this version(SUM aggregate with a CASE statement):

SELECT c.class_id,
       SUM
       (
        CASE
         WHEN s.student_id IS NULL THEN 0
         ELSE 1
        END
       ) as total_students 
  FROM classes c LEFT JOIN students s ON c.class_id = s.class_id
GROUP BY c.class_id;
share|improve this answer
    
cool, this works well, but when I add a condition related to students ex: WHERE s.student_tag='instate'; it goes back to the same result, except this time there is no 0 match. –  Stewie Mar 8 '12 at 3:08
    
I've updated the question with an edited query. –  Stewie Mar 8 '12 at 3:26
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It counts students per class and after that left join them (left to select all classes not only those with students) to classes. coalesce returns 0 for classes without students for those left join returns nulls.

select c.class_id, coalesce(s.total_students, 0) as total_students
from classes c
left join (
    select class_id, count(student_id) as total_students
    from students
    where student_type='instate'
    group by class_id
) s on c.class_id = s.class_id
share|improve this answer
    
although this did work, its very slow :( –  Stewie Mar 8 '12 at 14:30
    
@Stewie do you have indices on class_id in both tables? Do you have any indices? –  Michał Powaga Mar 8 '12 at 18:20
    
yes, class_id and student_id both are primary keys. and there is an index on student type. –  Stewie Mar 8 '12 at 18:44
    
@Stewie index on students.student_id is useless in this case, useful could be an index on students(class_id,student_type). How many rows are in students table? –  Michał Powaga Mar 9 '12 at 7:08
    
about 7million in students and 140K in classes ! student_id is the primary key, so the index is obvious. yes the above might help. let me look into that.. just that creating index on that would be a long downtime for the application (about 20-25 mins) –  Stewie Mar 9 '12 at 13:23
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