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Am starting to write a complex body of software in C++ that makes use of several other libraries, my concern write now is that I want only a limited number of classes to have access to these libraries but with C++ headers and object that includes the header should also get access to the classes dependencies. What is the most appropriate way around this?

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One suggestion would be to use to either use the pimpl or abstract "interface" patterns.

The pimpl pattern is where you store a pointer to a forward declared implementation class.

Example:


blah.hpp

class foo
{
    struct impl;
    impl* myImpl;
public:
    foo();
}

blah.cpp

#incldue <internalClass>
struct foo::impl
{
    internalClass o;
};

foo::foo()
{
   myImpl = new impl();
}

Another option would be to have a pure virtual abstract class (AKA an interface). Then you have a factory function( or factory class) return a pointer to your implementation. Thus client code never has to see the members inside your implementation.

Example:


inter.hpp

class inter
{
   virtual void doFoo() = 0;
   inter* create();
};

realInter.hpp

class realInter: public inter
{
   virtual void doFoo() { //blah blah blah}
   internalClass aMember;
};

inter.cpp

#include <realInter.hpp>
inter* inter::create()
{
   return new realInter();
}
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one idea i just thought of was using #ifdef's in the header and #define's in the matching .cpp file, that way all of the other classes are unable to use or see the libraries that im trying to hide. the idea im after is to limit the exposure of the headers from outside libraries so that no code interacts with them by accident – David Carpenter Mar 8 '12 at 5:13

If the objects from your library hold only pointers or references to objects from the the restricted library, you could forward-declare them in the header, rather than including the headers themselves. For example, you can do this

class restricted_lib_class1;
class restricted_lib_class2;

class my_class1 {
    restricted_lib_class1 *restricted1;
    restricted_lib_class2 *restricted2;
    // Other class members
};

instead of this:

#include <restricted.h> // contains definitions of restricted_lib_class1 and restricted_lib_class2

class my_class1 {
    restricted_lib_class1 *restricted1;
    restricted_lib_class2 *restricted2;
    // Other class members
};

In the case with forward declarations only the CPP file needs to include the restricted.h header.

Of course if you must include instances of "restricted" classes or inherit from them, you have no way around including their headers in your header files.

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This is called "using an opaque pointer." – Mike DeSimone Mar 8 '12 at 4:32

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