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My question is simple: I can do 2 * 10 with shift and addition by (2 << 2) + 2 but I have no idea how to get 2.2 * 10 with shift and addition. Any suggestions will be very appreciated.

-khan_gl

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If you are using double or float as I think, you can't simply. The binary representation of floating point number is a standardish nightmare. If you can deal with fixed point numbers, then it's easy. –  J.N. Mar 8 '12 at 4:36
    
Somewhat Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/7720668/… –  Mysticial Mar 8 '12 at 4:50
    
@BLUEPIXY: (x << 3) + (x << 2) is x * 12, not x * 012. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 8 '12 at 8:43
    
oh! misstake. (*10) is (x << 3) + (x << 1) –  BLUEPIXY Mar 8 '12 at 18:34
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3 Answers

This works:

2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 2.2 + (0 << 1)

Kidding aside, you can't as you can't shift floats in C++/C. Well, you can (via nasty type-punning), but then you're getting into undefined behavior.

Also, there's no point in doing it. If you're doing multiplication then just use *. The compiler will transform it into the most efficient form.

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What's 0 << 1 for? I don't think it's UB, the standard requires integer operands for shift operators. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 8 '12 at 4:47
    
The OP wants a shift... so... –  Mysticial Mar 8 '12 at 4:49
    
@Alex khan wanted a shift in there so I complied ;) The UB comes from casting the float to an int to perform the shift. –  Pubby Mar 8 '12 at 4:50
    
@Pubby: I see no undefined behavior. There is no cast from float to int. (0 << 1) is of type int, with the value 0. The result is implicitly converted from int to double (not float), which yields 0.0. What problem do you see? –  Keith Thompson Mar 8 '12 at 4:52
    
@KeithThompson Ah, guess it must be with type punning then. My example wasn't meant to show UB. –  Pubby Mar 8 '12 at 4:57
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If I understood your question at all,

2.2 = 2 + 2/10

Therefore, 2.2 * 10 = 2*10 + 2*10/10 = 2*10 + 2 = 22.

You can do division with shifts and subtractions.

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On a modern CPU, floating point numbers are represented in a format called "IEEE 754".

At the core of IEEE 754 floating point arithmetic are bit shifts and integer arithmetics. If you're patient you can write a naive implementation of IEEE 754 ALU in C. You might find this thread interesting:

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